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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Terclim 9 Terclim 2022 9 Session B - Oral presentations 9 Underpinning terroir with data: rethinking the zoning paradigm

Underpinning terroir with data: rethinking the zoning paradigm

Abstract

Terroir zoning has traditionally relied on a mixture of classical approaches to land classification and thematic mapping, coupled to various heuristics, ‘expert’ opinions and the whims of marketers and wine writers. Here, we show how, by using data-driven methods and focussing just on the land which supports grape production, rather than on all of the land within a winegrowing region, we might move towards a more robust terroir zoning. By using data to provide an improved understanding of terroir, such methods should also promote improved management of the entire wine value chain, offering quantitative indications of the impact of the biophysical characteristics of the places where grapes are grown on the chemical and sensory attributes of the wines derived from them.

Publication date: May 31, 2022

Issue: Terclim 2022

Type: Article

Authors

Rob Bramley¹, Jackie Ouzman¹, Brent Sams² and Mike Trought³

¹CSIRO, Waite Campus, Adelaide, Australia
²E&J Gallo Winery, Modesto, California, USA
³Innovative Winegrowing, Blenheim, New Zealand

Contact the author

Keywords

spatial analysis, precision viticulture, terroir zoning, sub-regionalisation

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Terclim 2022

Citation

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