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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 20-Year-Old data set: scion x rootstock x climate, relationships. Effects on phenology and sugar dynamics

20-Year-Old data set: scion x rootstock x climate, relationships. Effects on phenology and sugar dynamics

Abstract

Global warming is one of the biggest environmental, social, and economic threats. In the Douro Valley, change to the climate are expected in the coming years, namely an increase in average temperature and a decrease in annual precipitation. Since vine cultivation is extremely vulnerable and influenced by the climate, these changes are likely to have negative effects on the production and quality of wine.
Adaptation is a major challenge facing the viticulture sector where the choice of plant material plays an important role, particularly the rootstock as it is a driver for adaptation with a wide range of effects, the most important being phylloxera, nematode and salt, tolerance to drought and a complex set of interactions in the grafted plant.
In an experimental vineyard, established in the Douro Region in 1997, with four randomized blocs, with five varieties, Touriga Nacional, Tinta Barroca, Touriga Franca and Tinta Roriz, grafted in four rootstocks, Rupestris du Lot, R110, 196-17C, R99 and 1103P, data was collected consecutively over 20 years (2001-2020). Phenological observations were made two to three times a week, following established criteria, to determine the average dates of budbreak, flowering and veraison. During maturation, weekly berry samples were taken to study the dynamics of sugar accumulation, amongst other parameters. Climate data was collected from a weather station located near the vineyard parcel, with data classified through several climatic indices.
The results achieved show a very low coefficient of variations in the average date of the phenophases and an important contribution from the rootstock in the dynamic of the phenology, allowing a delay in the cycle of up to10-12 days for the different combinations. The Principal Component Analysis performed, evaluating trends in the physical-chemical parameters, highlighted the effect of the climate and rootstock on fruit quality by grape varieties.

DOI:

Publication date: May 31, 2022

Issue: Terclim 2022

Type: Article

Authors

Fernando Alves1, Joana Valente1, Frank S. Rogerson1, Ricardo Silva1, Cristina Carlos2,3, Catarina Barbosa2, Ana Morais2, Charles Symington1

1Symington Family Estates, Vinhos S.A. – Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
1ADVID Associação para o Desenvolvimento da Viticultura Duriense, Vila Real, Portugal
3CITAB, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, PT

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Keywords

climate, Douro, maturation, phenology, rootstock

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Terclim 2022

Citation

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