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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 AROMA AND SENSORY CHARACTERIZATION OF XINOMAVRO RED WINES FROM DIFFERENT GREEK PROTECTED DESIGNATIONS OF ORIGIN, EFFECT OF TERROIR CHARACTERISTICS

AROMA AND SENSORY CHARACTERIZATION OF XINOMAVRO RED WINES FROM DIFFERENT GREEK PROTECTED DESIGNATIONS OF ORIGIN, EFFECT OF TERROIR CHARACTERISTICS

Abstract

The quality of wines has often been associated with their geographical area of production. The aim of this work was to characterize Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Xinomavro red wines from different geographical areas of Amyndeon and Naoussa in Northern Greece, elaborated with variables that contribute to their differentiation, such as soil characteristics, altitude, monthly average temperature and rainfall.

Xinomavro fruit parcels from different vineyards within the two PDO zones (5 PDO Naoussa and 6 PDO Amyndeon) were vinified following a standard winemaking process. A total of 25 aroma compounds were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with simultaneous full scan and selected ion monitoring for data recording, and odor activity values (OAVs) were determined. A trained panel evaluated the wines using sensory descriptive analysis, rating a total of 13 aroma attributes.

According to the quantitative data, a complex aroma profile rich in higher alcohols, ethyl esters, acetate esters and fatty acids, with a contribution of terpenes and volatile phenols was recorded. Statistical data analysis techniques, ANOVA and Principal Component Analysis, showed the structure of the experimental data and the significant differences for each compound in the different wines. PDO Amynteon wines presented higher concentrations in 1-hexanol and higher intensity of green bell pepper attribute, while PDO Naoussa wines were higher in ethyl octanoate, ethyl 2-methylbutyrate and eugenol, with higher scores in berry fruit and spices attributes. Terroir and meso-climate characteristics correlated well with the data obtained and helped identify how typical aromas could be an expression of terroir.

This study provides an approach to the chemo-sensory fingerprinting of Xinomavro PDO wines. It will be further used to advance the understanding of how impact aroma compounds and sensory characteristics shape terroir expression and how this could be manipulated by viticultural and winemaking practices, under current and future climatic conditions.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Elli Goulioti¹, David Jeffery², Despina Lola¹, Dimitris Miliordos¹, Yorgos Kotseridis¹

1. Laboratory of Enology and Alcoholic Drinks, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855, Athens, Greece
2. School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, and Waite Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia

Contact the author*

Keywords

GC-MS, sensory analysis, terroir, typicity

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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