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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 OPTIMIZATION OF EXTRACTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN LC-HRMS METHOD TO QUANTIFY GLUTATHIONE IN WHITE WINE LEES AND YEAST DERIVATIVES

OPTIMIZATION OF EXTRACTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN LC-HRMS METHOD TO QUANTIFY GLUTATHIONE IN WHITE WINE LEES AND YEAST DERIVATIVES

Abstract

Glutathione is a natural tripeptide composed of l-glutamate, l-cysteine and glycine, found in various foods and beverages. In particular, glutathione can be found in its reduced (GSH) or oxidized form (GSSG) in must, wine or yeasts¹. Numerous studies have highlighted the importance of GSH in wine quality and aging potential². During winemaking, especially during aging on lees, GSH helps prevent the harmful effects of oxidation on the aroma of the wine³. Nevertheless, the amounts of GSH/GSSG present in wine lees are often unknown and the choice of operating conditions (quantity of lees and aging time) remains empirical.

Based on these observations, the present work aims at proposing an optimized method to extract and quantify the potential of glutathione from white wine lees and yeast derivatives. In this context, several parameters, such as the type of solvent, the extraction time and the solid-liquid ratio, were investigated. For each matrix, the optimization study was carried out using the Box-Behnken Design (3-factor, 3-level) based on 33 factorial experiments. The results showed that the main factor influencing the extraction efficiency was the ethanol concentration. After development and validation of a liquid chromatography−high resolution mass spectrometry quantitation method, GSH and GSSG were assayed in various white wine lees and yeast derivatives in order to investigate the influence of oenological parameters on their content. The results showed differences in concentration depending on the grape varieties and strains used.

For the first time, this study focused on the use of design of experiments and analytical techniques to highlight the presence of glutathione in wine lees and yeast derivatives. Moreover, this research offers promising perspectives for a better understanding of lees antioxidant potential during wine aging. More generally, by-products such as lees can provide new natural products to the food industry, with safer and better antioxidant qualities against oxidative damage.

 

1. Foyer, C. and Noctor, G., Plant Cell and Environemental, 28(8), p. 1056-1071, 2005 
2. Pons, A. et al., American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, 66(2), p. 187-194, 2015
3. Lavigne, V. and Dubourdieu, D., In 13th International Enology Symposium, 2002 

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Delphine Winstel1,2, Axel Marchal1,2 and Claudia Nioi1,2

1. Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux INP, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. Bordeaux Sciences Agro, Bordeaux INP, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33170 Gradignan, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

Glutathione, wine lees, RSM design, quantification

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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