terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 EFFECT OF FERMENTATION TEMPERATURE GRADIENT AND SKIN CONTACT ON ESTER AND THIOL PRODUCTION AND TROPICAL FRUIT PERCEPTION IN CHARDONNAY WINES

EFFECT OF FERMENTATION TEMPERATURE GRADIENT AND SKIN CONTACT ON ESTER AND THIOL PRODUCTION AND TROPICAL FRUIT PERCEPTION IN CHARDONNAY WINES

Abstract

Wines with tropical fruit aromas have become increasingly more available1,2. With increased availability of different wine styles, it has become important to understand the compounds that cause the fruity aromas in wine. Previous work using micro fermentations showed that fermentation temperature gradients and time on skins resulted in an increase in thiol and ester compounds post fermentation and these compounds are known to cause tropical fruit aroma in wines³. This work aimed to scale up these fermentations/operations to determine if the desired aromas could still be achieved and if there is a perceivable difference in tropical fruit aromas, liking, and emotional response in the wines at the consumer level. Four treatments were tested at varying fermentation temperature gradients and skin contact times: control fermentation at 13°C with no skin contact (SC0FG0), fermentation at 13°C with 18 hours of skin contact (SC1FG0), fermentation temperature gradient by time (20°C for 4 days then reduced to 13°C) with no skin contact (SC0FG1), fermentation temperature gradient by time with 18 hours of skin contact (SC1FG1). A change in winemaking scale did not alter the pH, residual sugar, or alcohol of the wines. Chemical analysis and descriptive sensory analysis were conducted to determine the alterations on the composition and aroma profiles of these wines. Check-all-that-apply (CATA) showed different prominent aromas for each wine treatment, with pome fruit, stone fruit, pineapple, honeysuckle, honey, and passionfruit being the most perceived aromas. Descriptive analysis (DA) showed that SC1FG0 was significantly different from both SC0FG1 and SC1FG1. SC1FG0 presented the most tropical fruit aromas, SC1FG1 presented more stone fruit, and SC0FG1 presented more honey and lemon/lime. Understanding the causes of tropical fruit aromas in wine and processes that alter these compounds is necessary to ensure winemakers can achieved tropical fruit quality consistently.

 

1. Scutarașu, E. C., Luchian, C. E., Vlase, L., Nagy, K., Colibaba, L. C., Trinca, L. C., & Cotea, V. V. (2022). Influence Evaluation of Enzyme Treatments on Aroma Profile of White Wines. Agronomy, 12(11), 2897.
2. Rabitti, N. S., Cattaneo, C., Appiani, M., Proserpio, C., & Laureati, M. (2022). Describing the Sensory Complexity of Italian Wines: Application of the Rate-All-That-Apply (RATA) Method. Foods, 11(16), 2417.
3. Iobbi, A. (2022). Tropical Fruit Aroma: Relevance to Oregon White Wines, the Effect of Winemaking Processes on Fermentation Esters and Volatile Thiol Levels, and the Relationship Between Sensory Perception and Volatile Chemistry. Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Chase J. Lucas¹, Angelica Iobbi¹, D.C. Cerrato¹, and Elizabeth Tomasino¹

1. Department of Food Science and Technology, Oregon State University, 100 Weigand Hall, 3051 SW Campus Way Corvallis, OR 97331

Contact the author*

Keywords

fermentation gradient, skin-contact, CATA, sensory analysis

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

IDENTIFICATION AND LEVELS OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS (TANINS, ANTHO-CYANS) IN RED VARIETAL WINES (PROKUPAC AND BLACK TAMJANIKA) FROM SERBIA

The phenolic compounds of red wines represent a source of numerous benefits for human health, which is why they are a constant subject of scientific research. Winemaking in Serbia has a growing economic significance, with particularly autochthonous varieties included [1]. This research identifies and quantifies phenolic compounds of Serbian red varietal wines of Prokupac and Black Tamjanika varieties. Quantification of the level of phenolics has been conducted, including molecular tannins [(+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, procyanidin dimers B1, B2, B3, B4], molecular anthocyanins, and the mean degree of polymerization of tannins by HPLC by UV detection, total antioxidant capacity via spectrophotometric methods and chromatic characteristics via CIELAB.

EFFECT OF MICRO-OXYGENATION IN COLOR OF WINES MADE WITH TOASTED VINE-SHOOTS

The use of toasted vine-shoots (SEGs) as an enological tool is a new practice that seeks to improve wines, differentiating them and encouraging sustainable wine production. The micro-oxygenation (MOX) technique is normally combined with alternative oak products with the aim to simulate the oxygen transmission rate that takes place during the traditional barrel aging. Such new use for SEGs implies a reduction in color due to the absorption by the wood of the responsible compounds, therefore, given the known effect that MOX has shown to have on the modification of wine color, its use together with the SEGs could result in an interesting implementation with the aim to obtain final wines with more stable color over time.

BIOPROTECTION BY ADDING NON-SACCHAROMYCES YEASTS : ADVANCED RESEARCH ON THIS PROMISING ALTERNATIVE TO SO₂

Sulphur dioxide has been used for many years for its antimicrobial, antioxidant and antioxydasic properties in winemaking but nowadays, it is a source of controversy. Indeed, consumers are more attentive to the naturalness of their foods and beverages and the legislation is changing to reduce the total SO₂ levels allowed in wines. To limit and replace the doses of sulphur dioxide applied, winemakers can now use bioprotection consisting in live yeast addition as alternative,seems to be promising. This process, lightly used in from the food industry, allows to colonize the environment and limit the development or even eliminate undesirable microorganisms without altering the sensory properties of the product.

UNEXPECTED PRODUCTION OF DMS POTENTIAL DURING ALCOOLIC FERMENTATION FROM MODEL CHAMPAGNE-LIKE MUSTS

The overall quality of aged wines is in part due to the development of complex aromas over a long period (1.) The apparition of this aromatic complexity depends on multiple chemical reactions that include the liberation of odorous compounds from non-odorous precursors. One example of this phenomenon is found in dimethyl sulphide (DMS) which, with its characteristic odor truffle, is a known contributor to the bouquet of premium aged wine bouquet (1). DMS supposedly accumulates during the ten first years of ageing thanks to the hydrolysis of its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSp.) DMSp is a possible secondary by-product from the degradation of S-methylmethionine (SMM), an amino acid iden- tified in grapes (2), which can be metabolized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

Microbial ecosystems in wineries – molecular interactions between species and modelling of population dynamics

Microbial ecosystems are primary drivers of viticultural, oenological and other cellar-related processes
such as wastewater treatment. Metagenomic datasets have broadly mapped the vast microbial species
diversity of many of the relevant ecological niches within the broader wine environment, from vineyard
soils to plants and grapes to fermentation. The data highlight that species identities and diversity
significantly impact agronomic performance of vineyards as well as wine quality, but the complexity
of these systems and of microbial growth dynamics has defeated attempts to offer actionable
tools to guide or predict specific outcomes of ecosystem-based interventions.