Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Effect of mixed Torulaspora delbrueckii-Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on rose quality wine

Effect of mixed Torulaspora delbrueckii-Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on rose quality wine

Abstract

Alcoholic fermentation using no Saccharomyces wine is an effective means of modulating wine aroma. This study investigated the impact of coinoculating Torulaspora delbruecki with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae commercial yeast (QA23, Lallemand; Red Fruit, Sepsa-Enartis) on enological quality parameters, volatile composition and sensory analysis. The following assays were performed on Tempranillo variety: Saccharomyces QA23 (CTQA), Saccharomyces Red Fruit (CTRF), coinoculated T. delbrueckii + S.cerevisiae QA23 (CIQA) and coinoculated T. delbrueckii + S.cerevisiae (CIRF). The results showed that chemical and sensory profiles of coinoculated wines were different from Saccharomyces-strain wines. Coinoculated wines (CIQA and CIRF) showed lower alcohol content, total acidity and malic acid meanwhile higher isobutanol and isoamylic alcohols with respect to their respective controls (CTQA and CTRF). Ester composition was significantly affected by the fermentation strategy. Coinoculated wines (CIQA and CIRF) were characterized by higher contents of ethyl esters of branched acids, (EEBAs), ethyl cinnamates (CINNs) and ethyl propionate. Meanwhile CT wines (CTQA and CTRF) shown higher significant quantities of higher acohol acetates (HAAs) and ethyl esters of straight chain fatty acids (EEs). In control wines, RF yeast produced higher quantities of (HAAs) in comparison with QA, where isoamyl acetate was the main contributor to differences. Color differences between coinoculated wines and their respective controls were human eye-perceptible (ΔE*ab ≥ 3 CIELab units). Sensory analysis aroma showed no significant differences. In the mouth coinoculated wines resulted less heat, according with alcohol content; meanwhile control wines had higher aroma intensity. The highest global score was got for CTRF wines.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Belen Puertas*, Emma Cantos, Ignacio Soto, Jose Manuel Muñoz-Redondo, María Ruiz-Moreno

*IFAPA

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Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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