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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Maturità fenolica e cellulare come metodo di valutazione dell’interazione vitigno-ambiente: il caso del Cabernet-Sauvignon

Maturità fenolica e cellulare come metodo di valutazione dell’interazione vitigno-ambiente: il caso del Cabernet-Sauvignon

Abstract

ln the current work, phenolic and cellular maturation curves were used to assess the degree of adaptation of the cultivar Cabernet sauvignon to the sites under esamination. Five wine­-producing zones with different pedoclimatic characteristics and latitudes were considered (Marche, Toscana, Emilia, Friuli and Slovenia). The grapes from these sites were evaluated in the period from the end of August to middle of October by analysing, in addition to the standard parameters, the potential and extractable anthocyanins, the total polyphenolic index and the tannins in grape seeds. The results obtained confirmed the suitability of the method to different production areas and the possibility of its use for the evaluation of the cultivar­-enviroment interaction.

DOI:

Publication date: March 2, 2022

Issue: Terroir 1998

Type: Article

Authors

G. COLUGNATI (1), F. BATTISTUTTA (2), E. CELOTTl (2), S. DA ROS (2), G. CRESPAN (1), F. BREGANT R (1), ZIRONl (2)

(1) Centra pilota per la vitivinicoltura, Via 3a Armata 69, 1-34710 Gorizia
(2) Dipartimento di Scienze degli alimenti, Via Marangoni 97, 1-33100 Udine

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Terroir 1998

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