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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 PROBING GRAPEVINE-BOTRYTIS CINEREA INTERACTION THROUGH MASS SPECTROMETRY IMAGING

PROBING GRAPEVINE-BOTRYTIS CINEREA INTERACTION THROUGH MASS SPECTROMETRY IMAGING

Abstract

Plants in their natural environment are in continuous interaction with large numbers of potentially pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms. Depending on the microbe, plants have evolved a variety of resistance mechanisms that can be constitutively expressed or induced. Phytoalexins, which are biocidal compounds of low to medium molecular weight synthesized by and accumulated in plants as a response to stress, take part in this intricate defense system.1,2

One of the limitations of our knowledge of phytoalexins is the difficulty of analyzing their spatial responsiveness occurring during plant- pathogen interactions under natural conditions.

Mass spectrometry imaging is an innovative analytical technique for the spatial mapping of molecules within a sample. It has the ability to provide valuable insights into the molecular processes underlying the interaction between a plant and a pathogen. Despite its advantages, to date, the studies of the application of MALDI-MSI to plants is not extensive, even more the ones investigating grapevine compounds.3–5

In a first part, the presentation will focus on the principle and characteristic data provided by this methodology involving a localized ion source and a high-resolution mass spectrometer. The following part will be dedicated to our work on the application of this methodology to investigate phytoalexin accumulation and distribution in leaf tissues of Vitis vinifera cv Chardonnay, infected with Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent for gray mold. We specifically investigate the accumulation and spatial distribution of resveratrol and its derivative oligomers through a time course infection using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization – mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Our results show that production of stilbene phytoalexins is rapidely activated by the presence of the pathogen, with a high molecular diversity as evidenced by the detection of various oligomeric forms. Moreover, the specific behavior of these compounds towards the propagation of the infection by the pathogen is clearly highlighted at the micron scale.

 

1. Jeandet, P.; Delaunois, B.; Conreux, A.; Donnez, D.; Nuzzo, V.; Cordelier, S.; Clément, C.; Courot, E. Biosynthesis, Metabolism, Molecular Engineering, and Biological Functions of Stilbene Phytoalexins in Plants. BioFactors 2010, 36 (5), 331–341.
2. Jeandet, P.; Uddin, M. S.; Clément, C.; Aziz, A.; Jacquard, C.; Khan, H.; Shah, M. A.; Barka, E. A.; Koffas, M.; Nabavi, S. M.; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E.; Renault, J.-H. Production of High Molecular-Ordered Stilbene Oligomers for the Study of Their Biological Activity: Total Synthesis, Bio-Catalyzed Synthesis and Production by Plant Systems. Nat. Prod. Rep. 2023.
3. Becker, L.; Carré, V.; Poutaraud, A.; Merdinoglu, D.; Chaimbault, P. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Simultaneous Location of Resveratrol, Pterostilbene and Viniferins on Grapevine Leaves. Molecules 2014, 19 (7), 10587–10600.
4. Maia, M.; McCann, A.; Malherbe, C.; Far, J.; Cunha, J.; Eiras-Dias, J.; Cordeiro, C.; Eppe, G.; Quinton, L.; Figueiredo, A.; De Pauw, E.; Sousa Silva, M. Grapevine Leaf MALDI-MS Imaging Reveals the Localisation of a Putatively Identified Sucrose Metabolite Associated to Plasmopara Viticola Development. Frontiers in Plant Science 2022, 13.
5. Maia, M.; Carré, V.; Aziz, A.; Jeandet, P. Molecular Localization of Phytoalexins at the Micron Scale: Toward a Better Understanding of Plant-Phytoalexin-Pathogen Dynamics. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2022.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Vincent Carré1, Maia Marisa1, Aziz Aziz2, Jeandet Philippe2

1. LCP-A2MC, Université de Lorraine, Metz, France
2. RIBP, USC INRAE 1488, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

Mass Spectrometry, Imaging Metabolomics, Plant-Pathogen Interaction, Stilbene phytoalexins

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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