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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE VINEYARD ENVIRONMENTS: VINE LEAVES, GRAPE BERRIES, WINES, HONEYBEES AND ASIAN HORNETS

PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE VINEYARD ENVIRONMENTS: VINE LEAVES, GRAPE BERRIES, WINES, HONEYBEES AND ASIAN HORNETS

Abstract

Synthetic pesticides are widely used in viticulture to ensure steady harvest quality and quantity. Fungicides are primarily used to control grapevine diseases but insecticides and herbicides are likewise used. Pesticide residues in viticultural areas currently represent a strong societal concern, but may also affect different trophic chains in such areas. In this project we wish to analyse honeybees collected from hives placed in different vineyards, their natural predator (the invasive hornet Vespa velutina), as well as the honey, grape berries, and wines produced. In order to screen the different pesticides found in our study areas, it was first necessary to optimize the extraction procedure. Pesticide residues in plant matrices such as leaf or grape berry are regularly monitored at the ISVV using QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. A QuEChERS method was adapted based on previously published work in order to analyse honeybees and single hornets, for which the quantity of samples is limited. The method was improved using a zirconium-based sorbent for d-SPE, which is used to reduce the matrix effect in lipidic commodities. The performance of this developed method was evaluated for 42 pesticide residues. A significant matrix effect was however noted for some molecules, thus procedural calibration was used to quantify pesticide residues in real samples. Methodological developments and pesticide residue quantification results in various matrices will be presented.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Céline Franc1, Léa Tison2, Louisiane Burkart2, Alice Rouzes2, Gilles de Revel1 and Denis Thiéry2

1. Univ. Bordeaux, INRAE, Bordeaux INP, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, UMR 1366, OENO, ISVV, Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. INRAE Bordeaux, UMR1065 SAVE, Villenave d’Ornon, France

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Keywords

analysis, pesticide contamination , QuEChERS, LC-MS/MS

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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