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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 OENOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF AUTOCHTHONOUS SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE PRODUCTION OF TYPICAL SAVATIANO WINES

OENOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF AUTOCHTHONOUS SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE PRODUCTION OF TYPICAL SAVATIANO WINES

Abstract

Due to the global demand for terroir wines, the winemaking industry has focused attention on exploiting the local yeast microflora of each wine growing region to express the regional character and enhance the sensory profile of wines such as varietal typicity and aroma complexity. The objective of the present study was to isolate and compare the indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in different vineyards in the Mesogeia – Attiki wine region (Greece), evaluate their impact on chemical composition and sensory profile of Savatiano wines and select the most suitable ones for winemaking process.

Yeast populations were collected from spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of Savatiano musts. The yeast isolates were tested for basic oenological parameters including sulphur dioxide and ethanol tolerance as well as H₂S production. Four S.cerevisiae strains were selected for microvinification in order to assess their technological properties and sensorial characteristics. The fermentation kinetics was monitored throughout the experiment, while the content of organic acids and glycerol production have been controlled daily using HPLC analysis.

Our study revealed that the indigenous S. cerevisiae strains are able to metabolize all sugars, produce a satisfactory amount of ethanol and contribute to a distinct sensory profile. Although, different growth rates and metabolic differences between strains were observed. The overall evaluation of the data highlights the potential of the indigenous S. cerevisiae strains to provide promising results in wine industry.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Despina Lola¹, Spiros Paramithiotis², Maria Dimopoulou³, Aikaterini Tzamourani³, Elli Goulioti¹, Yorgos Kotseridis¹

1. Laboratory of Enology and Alcoholic Drinks, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos St., 11855 Athens, Greece
2. Laboratory of Food Process Engineering, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos St., 11855 Athens, Greece
3. Department of Wine, Vine and Beverage Sciences, School of Food Science, University of West Attica, 28 Ag. Spyridonos St., 12243 Athens, Greece

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Keywords

yeast selection, technological properties, sensory evaluation, terroir wine

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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