terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 S. CEREVISIAE AND O. ŒNI BIOFILMS FOR CONTINUOUS ALCOHOLIC AND MALOLACTIC FERMENTATIONS IN WINEMAKING

S. CEREVISIAE AND O. ŒNI BIOFILMS FOR CONTINUOUS ALCOHOLIC AND MALOLACTIC FERMENTATIONS IN WINEMAKING

Abstract

Biofilms are sessile microbial communities whose lifestyle confers specific properties. They can be de-fined as a structured community of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced polymeric matrix and adherent to a surface and considered as a method of immobilisation. Immobilised microorganisms offer many advantages for industrial processes in the production of alcoholic beverages and specially increasing cell densities for a better management of fermentation rates. Controlling the speed of alcoholic (AF) and malolactic (MLF) fermentations in wine can be an important challenge for the production of certain short rotation wines for entry-level market segments.

The objective of this work was to design a continuous winemaking process using yeasts and bacteria biofilms. In a first part we showed the possibility of inducing the adhesion and biofilm formation by O. œni and S. cerevisiae separately, in low nutriment medium, on different materials already used in the winery environment. Then the biofilm formation was implemented in a 250 ml continuous bioreactor system for both microorganisms. At the end of the biofilm formation step, quantities of attached biomass (CFU counts) were close for all materials and over 5 log (UFC/cm²) for S. cerevisiae, over 6.2 log (UFC/cm²) for O. œni.

For continuous fermentations the inoculated supports were used in a similar 250 ml bioreactor with 3 different modalities: alcoholic fermentation (AF) by S. w in grape must, or Malo-Latic Fermentation (MLF) by O. oeni in wine or, co-fermentation (simultaneous AF and MLF) with both species biofilms feeded with grape must. The progress of the continuous fermentations was analysed. Over periods of 3 to 4 weeks under a continuous regime with a 48h residence time, stable consumption rates of 4 g/l/h for glucose + fructose and 1,8 g/l/24h for L-malic acid were reached in co-fermentations.

This biofilm continuous reactor could be the first step towards perfectly controlled industrial winemaking processes.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Marianne Gosset1,2, Yannick Manon², Magali Garcia² Christine Roques¹, Patricia Taillandier1*

1. LGC, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse, France
2. AB7 Industries, Chemin des Monges, BP9, 31450 Deyme, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

biofilms, continuous fermetnation, S. Cerevisiae, O. oeni

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

BORDEAUX RED WINES WITHOUT ADDED SULFITES SPECIFICITIES: COMPOSITIONAL AND SENSORY APPROACHES TOWARDS HIGHLIGHTING AND EXPLAI-NING THEIR SPECIFIC FRUITINESS AND COOLNESS

With the development of naturality expectations, wines produced without any addition of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) become very popular for consumers and such wines are increasingly present on the market. Recent studies also showed that Bordeaux red wines without added SO₂ could be differentiated from a sensory point of view from similar wines produced with SO₂¹. Thus, the aim of the current study was to characterize from a sensory point of view, specific aromas of wines without added SO₂ and to identify compounds involved.

USING CHECK-ALL-THAT-APPLY (CATA) TO CATEGORIZE WINES: A DECISION-MAKING TOOL FOR WINE SELECTION

Bordeaux is the largest appellation vineyard in France. This contrasting vineyard with varied terroirs offers all styles of wine, resulting from the blending of several grape varieties. If these different profiles make the renown of Bordeaux wines, it can appear as a constraint when the aim is to study Bordeaux wines in their diversity. The selection of a representative sample can be performed by a sensory analysis carried out by trained panelists or by wine professionals, which can take several forms: consensus among experts, conventional descriptive analysis, typicality or quality evaluation. However, because of time, economic, and logistical constraints, these methods have limited applications. As an alternative to classical descriptive analysis, more intuitive methods that do not require training have been proposed recently to describe wines using an expert panel such as Napping, Free Choice or Flash Profiling, CATA or RATA.

A synthesis approach on the impact of elevated CO2 on berry physiology and yield of Vitis vinifera

Besides the increase in global mean temperature the second main challenge of a changing climate is the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in relation to physiology and yield performance of grapevines. The benefits of increasing CO2 levels under greenhouse environment or open field studies have been well investigated for various annual crops. Research under free carbon dioxide enrichment on field-grown perennial plants such as grapevines is limited to a few studies. Further, chamber and greenhouse experiments have been conducted mostly on potted vines under eCO2 conditions.

FERMENTATION POTENTIAL OF INDIGENOUS NON-SACCHAROMYCES YEASTS ISOLATED FROM MARAŠTINA GRAPES OF CROATIAN VINEYARDS

The interest in indigenous non-Saccharomyces yeast for use in wine production has increased in recent years because they contribute to the complex character of the wine. The aim of this work was to investigate the fermentation products of ten indigenous strains selected from a collection of native yeasts established at the Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation in 2021, previously isolated from Croatian Maraština grapes, belonging to Hypopichia pseudoburtonii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Metschnikowia sinensis, Metschnikowia chrysoperlae, Lachancea thermotolerans, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora guillermondii, Hanseniaspora pseudoguillermondii, and Starmerella apicola species, and compare it with commercial non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains.

UNEXPECTED PRODUCTION OF DMS POTENTIAL DURING ALCOOLIC FERMENTATION FROM MODEL CHAMPAGNE-LIKE MUSTS

The overall quality of aged wines is in part due to the development of complex aromas over a long period (1.) The apparition of this aromatic complexity depends on multiple chemical reactions that include the liberation of odorous compounds from non-odorous precursors. One example of this phenomenon is found in dimethyl sulphide (DMS) which, with its characteristic odor truffle, is a known contributor to the bouquet of premium aged wine bouquet (1). DMS supposedly accumulates during the ten first years of ageing thanks to the hydrolysis of its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSp.) DMSp is a possible secondary by-product from the degradation of S-methylmethionine (SMM), an amino acid iden- tified in grapes (2), which can be metabolized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation.