terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 YEAST LEES OBTAINED AFTER STARMERELLA BACILLARIS FERMENTATION AS A SOURCE OF POTENTIAL COMPOUNDS TO IMPROVE SUSTAINABILITY IN WINE- MAKING

YEAST LEES OBTAINED AFTER STARMERELLA BACILLARIS FERMENTATION AS A SOURCE OF POTENTIAL COMPOUNDS TO IMPROVE SUSTAINABILITY IN WINE- MAKING

Abstract

The yeast residue left over after wine-making, known as wine yeast lees, is a source of various compounds that are of interest for wine and food industry. In winemaking, yeast-derived glycocompounds and proteins represent an example of circular economy approach since they have been proven to reduce the need for bentonite and animal-based fining agents. This leads to a reduced environmental impact in the stabilization and fining processes in winemaking. (de Iseppi et al., 2020, 2021). The recent discovery of the wine-making potential of the non-Saccharomyces yeast Starmerella bacillaris has sparked new interest in the use of this species for lees valorization, due to its potential difference in cellular composition from the conventional wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Lemos et al., 2016; Moreira et al., 2022). To investigate the cell compositions of yeasts present in the lees, 5 strains of Starmerella bacillaris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown in winemaking conditions. After cells harvesting, different cell components (from cell wall and cytoplasm) were separated by means of cell breakage with glass beads and further enzymatic or chemical treatments. The fractions were characterized in respect of sugar and protein content, by means of HPLC and SDS-PAGE separation, evidencing differences between the species in terms of mannose, glucose and N-acetylglucosamine profile, protein content and protein molecular size. To investigate the practical implications on winemaking, the fractions were tested on wine as agents of protein stabilization and fining. This allowed to make some preliminary evaluation about the potential applications of Starmerella bacillaris as yeast derivatives, obtained from yeast lees.

 

1. de Iseppi, A., Lomolino, G., Marangon, M., & Curioni, A. (2020). Current and future strategies for wine yeast lees valorization. In Food Research International (Vol. 137). Elsevier Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2020.109352
2. de Iseppi, A., Marangon, M., Vincenzi, S., Lomolino, G., Curioni, A., & Divol, B. (2021). A novel approach for the valorization of wine lees as a source of compounds able to modify wine properties. LWT, 136. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lwt.2020.110274
3. Lemos, W. J., Bovo, B., Nadai, C., Crosato, G., Carlot, M., Favaron, F., Giacomini, A., & Corich, V. (2016). Biocontrol ability and action mechanism of Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) isolated from wine musts against gray mold di-sease agent Botrytis cinerea on grape and their effects on alcoholic fermentation. Frontiers in Microbiology, 7(AUG). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01249
4. Moreira, L. de P. D., Nadai, C., Duarte, V. da S., Brearley-Smith, E. J., Marangon, M., Vincenzi, S., Giacomini, A., & Corich, V.(2022). Starmerella bacillaris Strains Used in Sequential Alcoholic Fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Improves Protein Stability in White Wines. Fermentation, 8(6), 252. https://doi.org/10.3390/FERMENTATION8060252/S1

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Zeno Molinelli 1,3, Chiara Nadai 2,3, Simone Vincenzi 1,3, Alessio Giacomini ¹, Celine Sparrow ⁴, Paolo Antoniali ⁵, Daniele Pizzinato ⁴, Antoine Gobert ⁴ and Viviana Corich 1,3

1. Department of Agronomy Food Natural Resources Animals and Environment (DAFNAE), University of   Padova, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, PD, Italy
2. Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry (TESAF), University of Padova,Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, PD, Italy
3. Interdepartmental Centre for Research in Viticulture and Enology (CIRVE), University of Padova,Viale XXVIII Aprile 14, 31015 Conegliano, TV, Italy
4. SAS Sofralab, 79 Ave AA Thevenet,BP 1031, Magenta, France
5. Italiana Biotecnologie, Via Vigazzolo 112, I-36054 Montebello Vicentino, Italy

Contact the author*

Keywords

non-saccharomyces yeast, Yeast cell walls, Yeast protein extracts, Yeast polysaccharides

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

OENOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF AUTOCHTHONOUS SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE PRODUCTION OF TYPICAL SAVATIANO WINES

Due to the global demand for terroir wines, the winemaking industry has focused attention on exploiting the local yeast microflora of each wine growing region to express the regional character and enhance the sensory profile of wines such as varietal typicity and aroma complexity. The objective of the present study was to isolate and compare the indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in different vineyards in the Mesogeia – Attiki wine region (Greece), evaluate their impact on chemical composition and sensory profile of Savatiano wines and select the most suitable ones for winemaking process.

EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL AND SENSORIAL PROFILE OF WINES ELABORATED WITH THEIR OWN TOASTED VINE-SHOOTS AND MICRO-OXYGENATION

The positive contribution of toasted vine-shoots (SEGs, Shoot from vines – Enological – Granule) used in winemaking to the chemical and sensory profile of wines has been widely proven. However, the combination of this new enological tool with other winemaking technologies, such as micro-oxygenation (MOX), has not been studied so far. It is known that micro-oxygenation is used in wineries to stabilizes color, improves structure or combining with oak alternatives products to achieve a more effective aroma integration of wines. For that, its implementation in combination with SEGs could result in differentiated wines.

HOW TO EVALUATE THE QUALITY OF NATURAL WINES?

The movement of Natural wines has clearly increased in the last few years, to reach a high demand from consumers nowadays. Switzerland has not been left out of this movement and has created a dedicated association in 2021. This association has the ambition to develop a specific tasting sheet for natural wines. The study of the tasting notes shows that the olfactory description of wines is recent but predominant today. But wine is a product makes to be drunk and not (just) to smell it. Based on these findings, a new 100-point tasting sheet has been developed. The main characteristics are 1) an evaluation in the mouth before the description of the olfaction, 2) to give 50% of the points on the judgment for the mouth characteristics, 3) to pejorate the visual aspects only if the wine is judged as “not drinkable” and 4) to express personal emotions.

EVALUATING WINEMAKING APPLICATIONS OF ULTRAFILTRATION TECHNOLOGY

Ultrafiltration is a process that fractionates mixtures using semipermeable membranes, primarily on the basis of molecular weight. Depending on the nominal molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) specifications of the membrane, smaller molecules pass through the membrane into the ‘permeate’, while larger molecules are retained and concentrated in the ‘retentate’. This study investigated applications of ultrafiltration technology for enhanced wine quality and profitability. The key objective was to establish to what extent ultrafiltration could be used to manage phenolic compounds (associated with astringency or bitterness) and proteins (associated with haze formation) in white wine.

TOWARDS THE SHELF-LIFE PREDICTION OF OLD CHAMPAGNE VINTAGES DEPENDING ON THE BOTTLE CAPACITY

Today, nearly one billion bottles of different sizes and capacities are aging in Champagne cellars while waiting to be put on the market. Among them, several tens of thousands of prestigious cuvees elaborated prior the 2000s are potentially concerned by prolonged aging on lees. However, when it comes to champagne tasting, dissolved CO₂ is a key compound responsible for the very much sought-after effer-vescence in glasses [1]. Yet, the slow decrease of dissolved CO₂ during prolonged aging of the most prestigious cuvees raises the issue of how long a champagne can age before it becomes unable to form CO₂ bubbles during tasting [2].