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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 ADDITION OF OAK WOOD ALTERNATIVE PRODUCTS: QUALITATIVE AND SENSORIAL EFFECTS FOR A WHITE WINE OF ALIGOTE

ADDITION OF OAK WOOD ALTERNATIVE PRODUCTS: QUALITATIVE AND SENSORIAL EFFECTS FOR A WHITE WINE OF ALIGOTE

Abstract

Wines matured in contact with wood are extremely popular with consumers all over the world. Oak wood allows the organoleptic characteristics of wine to be modified. Wines are enriched with volatile and non-volatile compounds extracted from the wood. The aromas extracted from oak wood contribute to the construction of the wine’s aromatic profile and the main polyphenols extracted can modify taste perceptions such as astringency and bitterness. All the compounds extracted from the wood thus contribute to the balance and quality of the wines.The maturation of wine in vats with the addition of alternative oak products has become increasingly popular in all wine producing countries of the world. The main reasons for the development of such products are the optimisation of their production, the reduction of the cost of wine ageing as well as the increase of the level of hygiene in the production. This study is part of this context and focuses on oak chips: an alternative wood product to barrels. It aims to evaluate the optimum dose and the best level of toasting of the oak wood for the addition of these chips during alcoholic fermentation in a white Aligoté wine. During our experiment, the white Aligoté must before alcoholic fermentation was added with different doses of chips (1-2-3-4-5 g/L) at different toasting levels (5 levels: fresh, light toasting, medium toasting, medium + toasting, strong toasting). A control wine could was also made without the addition of chips for comparison. In order to determine the optimal dose and toasting of the oak chips used, the classic oenological parameters (Foss: pH, Alcoholic Strength, Total Acidity, Volatile Acidity, Sugars), colour (A420nm and CIELAB parameters), total phenolic compounds (TPI, total tannins and Folin index), monomeric and dimeric proanthocyanidin, phenolic acid and ellagitannin composition (HPLC-UV/MS), as well as fruity and woody aroma markers (GC/MS) were analysed. Sensory analyses were also carried out for each wine.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Viktoriya Aleksovych1,3, Anne-Laure Gancel1,2, Oksana Tkachenko3, Pierre-Louis Teissedre1,2(*)

1. UMR Œnologie EA 4577, Université de Bordeaux, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. USC 1366 INRAE, IPB, INRAE, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
3. Faculty of wine and tourism business, ONUT, 112, Kanatna, Str. 65039, Odesa, Ukraine
4. M.V. Lomonosov Educational–Scientific Technological Institute of Food Industry, ONUT, 112, Kanatna, Str. 65039, Odesa, Ukraine

Contact the author*

Keywords

Aligoté white wine, oak chips, phenolic compounds, aroma markers

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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