Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Removal of Fumonisin B1 and B2 from red wine using polymeric substances

Removal of Fumonisin B1 and B2 from red wine using polymeric substances

Abstract

The Ability of PVPP (Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone), PVP-DEGMA-TAIC (copolimerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and triallyl isocyanurate) and PAEGDMA (poly(acrylamide-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)) polymers was tested as removal agents for Fumonisin B1 (FB1) and Fumonisin B2 (FB2) from model solutions and red wine. The polymers removal capacity was checked at three different resident times (2, 8 and 24 hours of contact time between the polymer and the sample), showing no differences in the percentage of FB1 and FB2 removal. Then, different polymer concentrations (1, 5 and 10 mg mL-1) were tested in model solution with and without phenolics (i.e. gallic acid and 4-methylcatechol). The three polymers were able to remove FB1 and FB2, with PVP-DEGMA-TAIC and PAEGDMA reaching removal values over 70%. The ability of PVPP to remove Fumonisins was affected by the presence of phenolics in solution; however, this was much less pronounced with the other two polymers. Finally, the effectiveness of the polymers was tested on red wine. A concentration of 10 mg mL-1 of PVP-DEGMA-TAIC polymer removed up to 86.0% for FB1 and 97.9% for FB2, but the amount of polyphenols in solution was affected, with a reduction of 62.7%. However, with a dose of 1 mg mL-1 of polymer, the removal of FB2 was about 70% with only 16.5% removal of polyphenols. The most promising polymer used was PAEGDMA, which removed 70.7% of FB1 and 95.1% of FB2 with only 22.2% removal of polyphenols.

Acknowledgements: Fondecyt grant Nº 314029

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Verónica Carrasco*, Christian Folch, Gal Kreitman, Ryan Elias, V. Felipe Laurie

*Universidad de Talca

Contact the author

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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