Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Assessing the effect of oak derived aromas on mouthfeel perception in Chardonnay wine

Assessing the effect of oak derived aromas on mouthfeel perception in Chardonnay wine

Abstract

Mouthfeel is an important quality parameter for Chardonnay wines, particularly those aged in oak. While research on mouthfeel has traditionally focused on the impact of non-aromatic compounds, the role of aroma compounds has largely been over looked. However, in wine as well as other food interactions between retronasal aroma and mouthfeel have been noted. The goal of this research was to investigate the impact of wine aroma on the perception of mouthfeel. Because of the importance of oak aging in the development of Chardonnay mouthfeel, the impact of oak aromas on perceived mouthfeel was explored. Aroma compounds associated with oak (ethyl palmitate, eugenol, furfural, isoeugenol, syringaldehyde, vanillin and whiskey lactone) were added to two different Chardonnay wines; one with no oak influence and one fermented in neutral oak. Low and high concentrations of the compounds were added based on concentrations typically found in barrel aged Chardonnay wine. A panel of Chardonnay winemakers evaluated the wines using descriptive analysis. The presence of oak aromas were found to alter mouthfeel perception in Chardonnay with wines where oak aroma compounds were added being described as having more volume, fullness, and softness. Many panelists also noted a change to mouthfeel associated with acidity. While the actual mechanism is unknown, it is clear that oak aromatics can affect the perception of mouthfeel. Therefore aromatics should be considered when investigating mouthfeel of white wines.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Elizabeth Tomasino*, Anthony Sereni, James Osborne

*Oregon State University

Contact the author

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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