Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Simultaneous monitoring of dissolved CO2 and collar from Rosé sparkling wine glasses: the impact of yeast macromolecules

Simultaneous monitoring of dissolved CO2 and collar from Rosé sparkling wine glasses: the impact of yeast macromolecules

Abstract

Champagne or sparkling wines elaborated through the same traditional method, which consists in two major yeast-fermented steps, typically hold about 10 to 12 g/L of dissolved CO2 after the second fermentation in a closed bottle. Hundreds of molecules and macromolecules originating from grape and yeast cohabit with dissolved CO2; they are essential compounds contributing to many organoleptic characteristics (effervescence, foam, aroma, taste, colour…). Indeed, the second alcoholic fermentation and the maturation on lees (which may last from 12 months up to several years) both induce various quantitative and qualitative changes in the wine through the action of yeast, as listed hereafter: development of aromas during aging on lees, release of nitrogen compounds during autolysis and release of macromolecules (polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids) in wine. The concentration of dissolved CO2 reached at the end of the “prise de mousse” is also a parameter of importance since it directly impacts the following properties: the visually appealing frequency of bubble formation in the glass, the growth rate of rising bubbles, the tingling sensation in mouth and the aromatic perception of Champagne and sparkling wines. In recent years, much interest has been devoted to better understand and depict each and every parameter involved in the release of gaseous CO2 from glasses poured with champagne or sparkling wines. Here, the impact of yeast macromolecules on the progressive losses of dissolved CO2 was closely examined, under standard tasting conditions. A Rosé sparkling wine was elaborated according to the traditional method and divided into different batches after the first alcoholic fermentation. Each wine was then supplemented with distinct preparations of yeast macromolecules before the second fermentation. Dissolved CO2 concentrations, fluxes of gaseous CO2 escaping from these Rosé sparkling wines served in standard laser-etched flutes, were simultaneously monitored, all along the first 10 min following pouring. The contribution of each yeast preparation to the collar height was also evaluated under the same tasting conditions.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Clara Cilindre*, Barbara Poty, Eric Ruppé, Gérard Liger-Belair, Néréa Iturmendi, Virginie Moine

*Equipe Effervescence – GSMA

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Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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