Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 What about oxygen transfer during wine aging in barrels?

What about oxygen transfer during wine aging in barrels?

Abstract

During wine aging, several complex phenomena of gas transfer take place in barrels due to the wine/oak contact. The efficiency of this gas transfer varies according to oak wood’s intrinsic physical properties. This research aims to better understand oxygen transfer phenomena through dry oak staves and especially through stave gaps, in order to reevaluate the importance of barrel-making on a barrel’s supply of oxygen. Experimentation was based on the development of an innovative permeameter of laboratory scale, for which the principal operating conditions concerning applied pressure, the choice of liquid phase/gas phase, and the grain type of oak are taken into account and investigated. With a specially developed tightening system, the existing pressure at stave gaps in a barrel could be reproduced on a laboratory scale in order to estimate its influence on oxygen transfer efficiency. Results showed that oxygen transfer through intact barrel wall is limited, the main oxygen transfer passage taking place through the weak zones in a barrel caused by fragile contact between staves. It is identified that oxygen transfer through stave gaps is largely impacted by applied pressure and by contact conditions on the surfaces of adjacent staves. These results confirm that the barrel-making process has a foremost impact on a barrel’s oxygen supply during the aging process.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Marie Mirabel*, Martine Mietton-Peuchot, Remy Ghidossi, Soizic Lacampagne, Vincent Renouf, Yang Qiu

*Chêne & Cie

Contact the author

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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