Terroir 2016 banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Environmental and viticultural practice effects on the phenolic composition of grapes: impact on wine sensory properties

Environmental and viticultural practice effects on the phenolic composition of grapes: impact on wine sensory properties

Abstract

Grape phenolic compounds are located in the internal layers of grape skins and seeds. They are synthesized via the phenyl-propanoid biosynthetic pathway which is modulated by both biotic and abiotic factors. Considerable research has been conducted to clarify the evolution pattern of grape phenolic compounds and the role of environmental and viticultural factors that can manipulate their levels at harvest. The accumulation of phenolic compounds in grapes may be influenced by grape variety, environmental conditions and viticultural practices. More notably, the influence of irrigation on the accumulation of anthocyanins in grapes has been treated by several authors reporting an overall positive impact of mild water deficit, attributed to changes in berry skin-to-pulp ratio, modifications in grape microclimate or differences in the partitioning of assimilates among vine organs. Moreover, light environment of the grapes, as affected directly by leaf removal, is reported to modify skin anthocyanin content, profile and extractability. However, under hot climate conditions, increased temperatures of exposed berries may hasten phenolic ripening and decouple skin and seed sensory traits. Concerning berry tannins, reports on the effects of environmental and viticultural conditions are fewer and inconsistent. Moreover, there is limited information available concerning the effects of environmental and viticultural conditions on the structural characteristics of grape proanthocyanidins, such as polymerization, galloylation and subunit composition, which define wine sensory properties.

DOI:

Publication date: June 23, 2020

Issue: Terroir 2016

Type: Article

Authors

Stefanos KOUNDOURAS

Laboratory of Viticulture, School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Forrestry and Natural Environment, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Campus 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece

Contact the author

Keywords

grapevine, anthocyanins, tannins, flavan-3-ols, astringency, bitterness, polymerization, irrigation, microclimate

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Terroir 2016

Citation

Related articles…

Pruning vine-shoots as a new enological additive to differentiate and improve the quality of wines

The objective of these work was to demonstrate that toasted fragments of pruning vine-shoots added to the wines after fermentation provide them with differentiated aromatic notes and improve their quality.

Chemical boundaries of wine identity: rationalizing grape and wine aroma diversity for improved terroir management

Aims: Wine perceived quality lies on a number of different factors. Among these, sensory features, which are in turn dependent on chemical composition, play a primary role. There is traditionally a great emphasis on producing wines that have specific sensory profiles, particularly aroma, that reflect identity features connected to the place and the variety of origin. In the case of high quality

Sensory impact of acetaldehyde addition in Syrah red wines

Acetaldehyde is a volatile carbonyl compound synthetized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation, but it can also be formed by oxidation of ethanol during wine aging [1]. At low concentration, it enhances the fruity aroma, however, at higher levels, it can generate the appearance of notes of bruised and rotten apple [2]. From a chemical point of view, acetaldehyde is a reactive low-

Ellagitannins and flavano-ellagitannins: concentration ranges in different areas and sensory evaluation

C-Glucosidic ellagitannins, which are the main polyphenolic compounds in oak heartwood, are extracted by wine during aging in oak barrels. Although such maturing of alcoholic beverages in oak barrels is a multi-centennial practice, very little is known on the impact of these ellagitannins on the organoleptic properties of red wine. The objectives of the present investigation were (i) to isolate oak ellagitannins and to hemisynthesize some made-in-wine flavano-ellagitannins, such as acutissimin A; (ii) to analyse their concentration ranges depending on the cultivar area and (iii) to evaluate their sensory impact on the basis of their human threshold concentrations and dose/response relationships in different types of solutions.

The “resources profile®”: a relevant decision and support system for adapting viticultural practices to soils agronomic properties and limiting their environmental impacts

Soil is a three-dimensional complex system, which constitutes a major component of Terroir. Soil characteristics strongly influence vine development, grape oenological potentialities and thus wine quality and style.