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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Vite e territorio. Il caso della Franciacorta nel medioevo

Vite e territorio. Il caso della Franciacorta nel medioevo

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Publication date: March 2, 2022

Issue: Terroir 1998

Type: Article

Authors

GABRIELE ARCHETTI

Dipartimento di Studi Medievali, Umanistici e Rinascimentali
Università Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Milano

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IVES Conference Series | Terroir 1998

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