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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Congress on Grapevine and Wine Sciences 9 2ICGWS-2023 9 Rootstock effect on Cabernet Sauvignon aromatic and chemical composition

Rootstock effect on Cabernet Sauvignon aromatic and chemical composition

Abstract

Grape quality potential for wine production is strongly influenced by environmental parameters and agronomic factors. Several studies underline the rootstock effect on scions vegetative growth and berry composition [1] with an impact on wine quality. Rootstocks are promising agronomic tools for climate change adaptation and in most grape-growing regions the potential diversity of rootstocks is not fully used and only a few genotypes are planted. Moreover, little is known about the effect of rootstock genetic variability on the aromatic composition in wines.

The purpose of this communication is to highlight how rootstocks influence Cabernet-Sauvignon red wine aromatic and chemical composition.

This study was conducted in GreffAdapt plot (55 rootstocks × 5 scions × 3 blocks) on a selection of rootstocks focusing on Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon [1]. Grape samples were collected and fermented in triplicate at laboratory scale under standardized conditions; wines were stabilized and stored at the end of alcoholic fermentation [2].

Esters, higher alcohols, terpenes, C13-Norisoprenoid and methoxypyrazines were performed to evaluate rootstock impact on chemical composition. sensory profile preceded by a panel training as well as Napping were carried out to evaluate samples aromatic expression.

1) Marguerit E. et al. (2019) A relevant experimental vineyard to speed up the selection of grapevine rootstocks. In Proceedings of the 21th International Giesco meeting, Tessaloniki, Greece, 24–28 June 2019; Koundouras, S., Ed.; pp. 204–208
2) Trujillo M. et al. (2022) Impact of Grape Maturity on Ester Composition and Sensory Properties of Merlot and Tempranillo Wines. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 70(37), 11520-11530, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.2c00543

DOI:

Publication date: October 4, 2023

Issue: ICGWS 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Laura FARRIS1,2, Justine GARBAY1,2, Marine MOREL3, Edouard PELONNIER-MAGIMEL1,2, Laurent RIQUIER1,2, Georgia LYTRA1,2, Elisa MARGUERIT3, Jean-Christophe BARBE1,2

1Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux INP, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2Bordeaux Sciences Agro, Bordeaux INP, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33170 Gradignan, France
3EGFV, Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, INRAE, ISVV, F-33882, Villenave d’Ornon, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

rootstock, Cabernet Sauvignon, sensory analysis, gas chromatography

Tags

2ICGWS | ICGWS | ICGWS 2023 | IVES Conference Series

Citation

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