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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Congress on Grapevine and Wine Sciences 9 2ICGWS-2023 9 Metabolomic profiling of heat-stressed grape berries 

Metabolomic profiling of heat-stressed grape berries 

Abstract

The projected rise in mean air temperatures together with the frequency, intensity, and length of heat waves in many wine-growing regions worldwide will deeply impact grape berry development and quality. Several studies have been conducted and a large set of molecular data was produced to better understand the impact of high temperatures on grape berry development and metabolism[1]. According to these data, it is highly likely that the metabolomic dynamics could be strongly modulated by heat stress (HS). Hence, the objective of the present study is to investigate the metabolome profiling on grape berries, exposed or not, to high temperature. We applied HS directly on clusters from V. vinifera L. Cabernet Sauvignon (heat sensitive genotype) and V. vinifera L.  Merlot (heat tolerant genotype) at different developmental stages. HS was applied continuously from 8:00 am to 16:00 pm for up to 10 days in greenhouse. The temperature difference between the HS-treated and control bunches was 9 °C. Berry samples were collected after both short-term and long-term HS treatment and metabolomic analyses were conducted using the untargeted LC-MS approach. Data processing was performed by MS-DIAL 4.94 and MetaboAnalyst 5.0.

Our first set of results highlights metabolites and distinct biochemical pathways impacted by HS, according to the thermotolerance ability of the evaluated cultivars. Our data also underline the temporal dynamics of metabolic responses triggered by HS, highlighting the importance of characterizing these metabolic changes at different time scales.

Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the ANR (PARASOL Project, ANR-20-CE21-0003) and X. Z. PhD thesis is founded by China Scholarship Council. The authors would like to EGFV Materiel-Vegetal team and Dr. Erwan Chavonet for the fruit cutting production.

References:

  1. Lecourieux F. et al. (2017) Dissecting the biochemical and transcriptomic effects of a locally applied heat treatment on developing cabernet sauvignon grape berries. Front Plant Sci 8: 53

DOI:

Publication date: October 5, 2023

Issue: ICGWS 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Xi ZHAN1*, Adam ROCHEPEAU2, Cédric CASSAN2, Fatma OUAKED-LECOURIEUX1, Pierre PETRIACQ2, David LECOURIEUX1

1EGFV, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, INRAE, ISVV, Villenave d’Ornon, France 
2Bordeaux Metabolome, INRAE Bordeaux Nouvelle Aquitaine, INRAE, Villenave d’Ornon, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

grapevine, berry quality, metabolomics, high temperature, climate change

Tags

2ICGWS | ICGWS | ICGWS 2023 | IVES Conference Series

Citation

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