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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Congress on Grapevine and Wine Sciences 9 2ICGWS-2023 9 The environmental footprint of selected vineyard management practices: A case study from Logroño (La Rioja) Spain

The environmental footprint of selected vineyard management practices: A case study from Logroño (La Rioja) Spain

Abstract

Viticulture is globally important for socioeconomic and environmental reasons. The EU is globally leading grape and wine production, and Spain is among the top grape and wine producers. As climate change affects viticulture, mitigation and adaptation are crucial for protecting grape production. In this research work, data on viticultural management practices such as soil cultivation, irrigation, energy, machinery, plant protection and the use of fertilizers from vineyards located in Logroño (La Rioja) have been obtained. These data were employed in building a model for grape production using Life Cycle Assessment, according to the EU framework for wine PEF. Environmental indicators such as global warming (kg CO2-eq), water use (m3) and energy (MJ) per kg of grapes produced, were estimated to explore those viticultural practices that minimize the environmental impact of viticulture. Low-input viticulture is the way to sustainability for the grape production sector.

DOI:

Publication date: October 10, 2023

Issue: ICGWS 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Vassilis Litskas1*, David Labarga2, Alicia Pou Mir2, Nikolaos Tzortzakis3 and Aziz Aziz4

VL Sustainability Metrics LTD, Lefkosia, Cyprus
Instituto de Ciencias de la Vid y del Vino (ICVV), Logroño (La Rioja) ESPAÑA
3 Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus
4 University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

LCA, Environmental Footprint, MiDiVine project, Green Deal, sustainable viticulture

Tags

2ICGWS | ICGWS | ICGWS 2023 | IVES Conference Series

Citation

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