terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 ABOUT THE ROLE PLAYED BY THE DIFFERENT POLYPHENOLS ON OXYGEN CONSUMPTION AND ON THE ACCUMULATION OF ACETALDEHYDE ANDSTRECKER ALDEHYDES DURING WINE OXIDATION

ABOUT THE ROLE PLAYED BY THE DIFFERENT POLYPHENOLS ON OXYGEN CONSUMPTION AND ON THE ACCUMULATION OF ACETALDEHYDE ANDSTRECKER ALDEHYDES DURING WINE OXIDATION

Abstract

In a previous work1, it was suggested that the different contents in delphinidin and catechin of the grapes were determinant on the O2 consumption and Strecker aldehyde (SAs) accumulation rates. Higher delphinidin seemed to be related to a faster O2 consumption and a smaller SAs accumulation rate, and the opposite was observed regarding catechin.

In the present paper, these observations were fully corroborated by adding synthetic delphinidin to a wine model containing polyphenolic fractions (PFs) extracted from garnacha and synthetic catechin to a wine model containing PF extracted from tempranillo: The delphinin-containing garnacha model consumed O₂ significantly faster and accumulated significantly smaller amounts of SAs than the original garnacha model, and the catechin-containing tempranillo model, consumed O2 significantly slower and accumulated significantly higher amounts of SAs than the original tempranillo model.

The work was further expanded by studying the effects of 8 individual polyphenols (delphinidin, malvidin, caffeic and coumaric acids, catechin, epigallocatechin, quercetin and myricetin) in normalized wine models subjected to a forced oxidation procedure on the O2 consumption rates (OCRs) and acetaldehyde and SAs accumulation rates.

Most surprisingly, all polyphenols but anthocyanins, initially slowed down OCRs observed in the plain wine model, which contained cation metals, hydrogen sulfide, cysteine and glutathione in reduced forms. Leaving aside anthocyanins, only B-ring tri-hydroxylated polyphenols were able to consume all O2 supplied. Moreover, the polyphenol determined also the fraction of ethanol oxidized to acetaldehyde. Catechin is the strongest inducer of ethanol oxidation, while delphinidin and epigallocatechin were the weakest.

Regarding SAs, the surprising finding is that, considering formation per O2 consumed, these are most efficiently formed in the basic wine model without polyphenols. Efficiency comes to a minimum with delphinidin, followed by coumaric acid and malvidin.

These set of results introduces a completely new perspective to wine oxidation kinetics and to the accumulation of aldehydes.

Funded by Spanish MICYN, PID2021-126031OB-C21

1. Bueno-Aventin, E., Escudero, A., Fernandez-Zurbano, P., & Ferreira, V. (2021). Role of Grape-Extractable Polyphenols in the Generation of Strecker Aldehydes and in the Instability of Polyfunctional Mercaptans during Model Wine Oxidation. J Agric Food Chem, 69(50), 15290-15300

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Vicente Ferreira, Elena Bueno-Aventín, Ignacio Ontañón, Ana Escuder

Laboratorio de Análisis del Aroma y Enología -LAAE. Affiliated to Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2) (UNIZAR-CITA). Dept. Anal. Chem., Fac. of Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, SPAIN

Contact the author*

Keywords

oxidation, acetaldehyde, Strecker aldehydes, polyphenols

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

INCREASING PINOT NOIR COLOUR DENSITY THROUGH SEQUENTIAL INOCULATION OF FLOCCULENT COMMERCIAL WINE YEAST SPECIES

Vitis vinifera L. cv. Pinot noir can be challenging to manage in the winery as its thin skins require careful handling to ensure sufficient extraction of wine colour to promote colour stability during ageing.1 Literature has shown that fermentation with flocculent yeasts can increase red wine colour density.2 As consumers prefer greater colour density in red wines,3 the development of tools to increase colour density would be useful for the wine industry. This research explored the impact of interspecies sequential inoculation and co-flocculation of commercial yeast on Pinot noir wine colour.

S. CEREVISIAE AND O. ŒNI BIOFILMS FOR CONTINUOUS ALCOHOLIC AND MALOLACTIC FERMENTATIONS IN WINEMAKING

Biofilms are sessile microbial communities whose lifestyle confers specific properties. They can be defined as a structured community of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced polymeric matrix and adherent to a surface and considered as a method of immobilisation. Immobilised microorganisms offer many advantages for industrial processes in the production of alcoholic beverages and specially increasing cell densities for a better management of fermentation rates.

UNTARGETED METABOLOMICS ANALYSES TO IDENTIFY A NEW SWEET COMPOUND RELEASED DURING POST-FERMENTATION MACERATION OF WINE

The gustatory balance of dry wines is centered on three flavors, sourness, bitterness and sweetness. Even if certain compounds were already identified as contributing to sweetness, some taste modifications remain largely unexplained1,2. Some empirical observations combined with sensory analyzes have shown that an increase of wine sweetness occurs during post-fermentation maceration³. This step is a key stage of red winemaking during which the juice is left in contact with the marc, that contains the solid parts of the grape (seeds, skins and sometimes stems). This work aimed to identify a new taste-active compound that contributes to this gain of sweetness.

CHEMICAL DRIVERS OF POSITIVE REDUCTION IN NEW ZEALAND CHARDONNAY WINES

According to winemakers, wine experts and sommeliers, aromas of wet stone, mineral, struck match and flint in white wines styles, such as those produced from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay, are considered to be hallmarks of positive reduction.1,2 In recent years, the production of Chardonnay styles defined by aroma characteristics related to positive reduction has become more desirable among wine experts and consumers. The chemical basis of positive reduction is thought to originate from the concentration of specific volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including methanethiol (MeSH) imparting mineral and chalk notes,3 and benzenemethanethiol (BMT) responsible for struck match and flint.1,4

FOLIAR APPLICATION OF METHYL JASMONATE AND METHYL JASMONATE PLUSUREA: INFLUENCE ON PHENOLIC, AROMATIC AND NITROGEN COMPOSITION OFTEMPRANILLO WINES

Phenolic, volatile and nitrogen compounds are key to wine quality. On one hand, phenolic compounds are related to wine color, mouthfeel properties, ageing potential. and are associated with beneficial health properties. On the other hand, wine aroma is influenced by hundreds of volatile compounds. Fermentative aromas represent, quantitatively, the wine aroma, and among these volatile compounds, esters, higher alcohols and acids are mainly responsible for the fermentation bouquet.