terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 WINE AS AN EMOTIONAL AND AESTHETIC OBJECT: IMPACT OF EXPERTISE

WINE AS AN EMOTIONAL AND AESTHETIC OBJECT: IMPACT OF EXPERTISE

Abstract

Wine tasting has been shown to provide emotions to tasters (Coste et al. 2018). How will expertise impact this emotional response? Burnham and Skilleås (2012) reported that the cultural, experiential, and aesthetic competencies characterize an expert in wine compared to a novice. Although there is no consensual definition of an aesthetic experience, Burnham and Skilleås (2012) reported that aesthetic appreciation is “disinterested, normative for others and communicable” in comparison to sensory pleasure. In another sector where the emotional impact takes an important place, the artistic sector, Leder et al. (2014) demonstrated that expertise exerts an influence on cognitive and emotional processing, which results in attenuated emotional reactions. Paasschen et al. (2015) reported that the cognitive aspects of artistic evaluation, relating to the aesthetic aspects would strongly depend on expertise, but that the affective components would on the contrary be less affected by the expertise, and consistent between all the observers. These results are consistent with the Kantian notion that an aesthetic position is emotionally distanced. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of expertise on emotions and aesthetic judgment in wine tasting.

To answer this issue, 20 oenologists, 20 musicians and 20 novices had tasted 6 red wines. Two kinds of emotional responses were measured and previously validated in a wine tasting context. The first one is a conscious and subjective response, the cognitive component of emotion (also called feelings). This response was measured using self-declarative questionnaires. The second kind of emotional response is an unconscious and objective response. The unconscious part of emotions was evaluated with measurement of the response of the autonomic nervous system (heart rate and electrodermal activity). The emotional responses were compared to the aesthetic judgments of wines evaluated with self-declarative questionnaires.

The aim was to evaluate whether there is a contradiction between the supposed distanced declarative response of the expert and the unconscious physiological emotional response. Moreover, the results obtained with musicians allowed to determine whether the impact of the expertise is specific or transposable to another aesthetic field.

 

1. Burnham, D. and Skilleås, O.M. (2012). The aesthetics of wine. Wiley-Blackwell.
2. Coste, A., Sousa, P., & Malfeito-Ferreira, M. (2018). Wine tasting based on emotional responses: An expedite approach to distinguish between warm and cool climate dry red wine styles. Food research international (Ottawa, Ont.), 106, 11–21
3. Leder, H., Gerger G., Brieber D., Schwarz N. (2014). What makes an art expert? Emotion and evaluation in art appreciation. Cognition and emotion. 28(6) : 1137-1147.
4. Van Paasschen, J., Bacci, F., & Melcher, D. P. (2015). The Influence of Art Expertise and Training on Emotion and Preference Ratings for Representational and Abstract Artworks. PloS one, 10(8), e0134241.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Inès Elali¹, Gilles de Revel¹, Emilie Paudois¹, Laurent Riquier¹, Katia M’Bailara3,4, Eric Giraud-Héraud², Sophie Tempère¹

1. Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux INP, BSA, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, BSE, UMR 6060, INRAE, F-33600 Pessac, France
3. Univ. Bordeaux, LabPsy, EA 4139, France 
4. Hospital Charles Perrens, Bordeaux, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

emotions, expertise, aesthetic, sensory analysis

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

SENSORY EVALUATION OF WINE AROMA: SHOULD COLOR-DRIVEN DESCRIPTORS BE USED?

The vocabulary used to describe wine aroma is commonly organized according to color, raising the question of whether they reflect the reality of olfactory perception. Previous studies have assumed this convention of color-aroma matching, and have investigated color’s influence on the perception of aroma only in dyed white wine or in red wine from particular places of origin. Here 48 white and red varietal wines from around the world were evaluated in black glasses then in clear glasses by a panel of wine experts, who gave intensity ratings for aroma attributes commonly used by wine professionals. In black glasses, aromas conventionally associated with white wine were perceived in the red wines, and vice versa.

EXPLORING THE ROLE OF TRANSITION METAL IONS IN THE EVOLUTION OF ESTERS COMPOSITION OF YOUNG WHITE WINE DURING AGEING

Young white wines are typically released to the market a few months after harvest, to be consumed within a year, when their fresh fruity aromas are still dominant and appealing to modern consumers. Esters, particularly higher alcohol acetates (HAAs) and ethyl esters of fatty acids (EEFAs), play a central role in the fruity expression of young white wines [1]. However, these esters are known to undergo significant hydrolysis during the first months of aging [1, 2].

WINE SWIRLING: A FIRST STEP TOWARDS THE UNLOCKING OF THE WINE’STASTER GESTURE

Right after the pouring of wine in a glass, a myriad of volatile organic compounds, including ethanol, overwhelm the glass headspace, thus causing the so-called wine’s bouquet [1]. Otherwise, it is worth noting that during wine tasting, most people automatically swirl their glass to enhance the release of aromas in the glass headspace [1]. About a decade ago, Swiss researchers revealed the complex fluid mechanics underlying wine swirling [2]. However, despite mechanically repeated throughout wine tasting, the consequences of glass swirling on the chemical space found in the headspace of wine glasses are still barely known.

FERMENTATION POTENTIAL OF INDIGENOUS NON-SACCHAROMYCES YEASTS ISOLATED FROM MARAŠTINA GRAPES OF CROATIAN VINEYARDS

The interest in indigenous non-Saccharomyces yeast for use in wine production has increased in recent years because they contribute to the complex character of the wine. The aim of this work was to investigate the fermentation products of ten indigenous strains selected from a collection of native yeasts established at the Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation in 2021, previously isolated from Croatian Maraština grapes, belonging to Hypopichia pseudoburtonii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Metschnikowia sinensis, Metschnikowia chrysoperlae, Lachancea thermotolerans, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora guillermondii, Hanseniaspora pseudoguillermondii, and Starmerella apicola species, and compare it with commercial non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains.

A NEW TOOL TO QUANTIFY COMPOUNDS POTENTIALLY INVOLVED IN THE FRUITY AROMA OF RED WINES. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION TO THE STU-DY OF THE FRUITY CHARACTER OF RED WINES MADE FROM VARIOUS GRAPE VARIETIES

A wide range of olfactory descriptors ranging from fresh and jammy fruit notes to cooked and oxidized fruit notes could describe the fruity aroma of red wines [1]. The fruity character of a wine is mainly related to the grape variety selected, to the terroir and the vinification process applied for its conception. In white wines, some volatile compounds confer directly their aroma to the wine while the question of “key” compound is more complex in red wines. According to many studies performed over the past decades, some fruity ethyl esters are directly involved in the fruity perception of red wines while others, present at subthreshold concentrations, participate indirectly to the fruity expression via perceptive interactions [2].