terclim by ICS banner
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION DRIVES THE SELECTION OF OENOCOCCUS OENI STRAINS IN WINE

ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION DRIVES THE SELECTION OF OENOCOCCUS OENI STRAINS IN WINE

Abstract

Oenococcus oeni is the predominant lactic acid bacteria species in wine and cider, where it performs the malolactic fermentation (MLF) (Lonvaud-Funel, 1999). The O. oeni strains analyzed to date form four major genetic lineages named phylogroups A, B, C and D (Lorentzen et al., 2019). Most of the strains isolated from wine, cider, or kombucha belong to phylogroups A, B+C, and D, respectively, although B and C strains were also detected in wine (Campbell-Sills et al., 2015; Coton et al., 2017; Lorentzen et al., 2019; Sternes and Borneman, 2016). This study was performed to better understand the distribution of the phylogroups in wine and cider. Their population dynamics were determined by qPCR all through wine and cider productions, and the behavior of the strains was analyzed in synthetic wines and ciders. Phylogroups A, B and C were all represented in grape must and throughout the alcoholic fermentation, but on the transition to MLF, only phylogroup A remained at high levels in all wine productions. In the case of cider, phylogroups A, B and C were detected in stable levels during the process. When they were tested in synthetic wine and cider, all phylogroups performed MLF, but with different survival rates depending on the ethanol content. In this sense, ethanol and fermentation kinetics are the main agent that drives the selection of phylogroup A strains in wine, while B and C strains dominates in cider containing less ethanol.

 

1. Campbell-Sills, H., El Khoury, M., Favier, M., Romano, A., Biasioli, F., Spano, G., Sherman, D.J., Bouchez, O., Coton, E., Coton, M., Okada, S., Tanaka, N., Dols-Lafargue, M., Lucas, P.M., 2015. Phylogenomic analysis of Oenococcus oeni reveals specific domestication of strains to cider and wines. Genome Biol. Evol. 7, 1506–1518. https://doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evv084
2. Coton, M., Pawtowski, A., Taminiau, B., Burgaud, G., Deniel, F., Coulloumme-Labarthe, L., Fall, A., Daube, G., Coton, E., 2017. Unraveling microbial ecology of industrial-scale Kombucha fermentations by metabarcoding and culture-based methods. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 93, 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fix048
3. Lonvaud-Funel, A., 1999. Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine. Antonie van Leeuwen-hoek, Int. J. Gen. Mol. Microbiol. 76, 317–331. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1002088931106
4. Lorentzen, M.P., Campbell-Sills, H., Jorgensen, T.S., Nielsen, T.K., Coton, M., Coton, E., Hansen, L., Lucas, P.M., 2019. Expanding the biodiversity of Oenococcus oeni through comparative genomics of apple cider and kombucha strains. BMC Genomics 20, 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-019-5692-3
5. Sternes, P.R., Borneman, A.R., 2016. Consensus pan-genome assembly of the specialised wine bacterium Oenococcus oeni. BMC Genomics 17, 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-016-2604-7

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Aitor Balmaseda1,2,3, Marc Lorentzen1,2, Lucie Dutilh1,2, Rémi Bauduin⁴, Hugues Guichard⁴, Séverine Ollivier4, Cécile Miot-Sertier1,2, Patrick M. Lucas1,2

1. Univ. Bordeaux, INRAE, Bordeaux INP, UMR 1366, OENO, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. Bordeaux Sciences Agro, F-33170 Gradignan, France
3. Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Departament de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Facultat d’Enologia, Grup de Biotecnologia Enològi-ca, C/ Marcel⟨lí Domingo 1, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain
4. Institut Français des Produits Cidricoles (IFPC), Domaine de la Motte, Le Rheu, 35653, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

Oenococcus oeni, Malolactic fermentation, Population dynamics, phylogroups

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

Related articles…

UNEXPECTED PRODUCTION OF DMS POTENTIAL DURING ALCOOLIC FERMENTATION FROM MODEL CHAMPAGNE-LIKE MUSTS

The overall quality of aged wines is in part due to the development of complex aromas over a long period (1.) The apparition of this aromatic complexity depends on multiple chemical reactions that include the liberation of odorous compounds from non-odorous precursors. One example of this phenomenon is found in dimethyl sulphide (DMS) which, with its characteristic odor truffle, is a known contributor to the bouquet of premium aged wine bouquet (1). DMS supposedly accumulates during the ten first years of ageing thanks to the hydrolysis of its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSp.) DMSp is a possible secondary by-product from the degradation of S-methylmethionine (SMM), an amino acid iden- tified in grapes (2), which can be metabolized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

DOES LIGNIN AN ACCEPTABLE MARKER OF GRAPESEED MATURATION AND QUALITY?

Usually the winemaker consider polyphenols from the grape berry as an actor of the wine quality. There are frequently consider as a marker of grape maturity. It is commonly known that winemaker consider tannins and anthocyanins as main polyphenol actors for winemaking practices and wine quality. Here we will focus on the characterisation of lignins in grape seeds. Previous studies suggest that the seed is lignified [1], which could explain the change in colour of the seed when it reaches maturity and thus provide a reliable indicator for describing the maturity stage in the seed.

IMPACT OF HARVEST DATE ON THE FINE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION OF MUST AND BORDEAUX RED WINE (VAR. MERLOT, CABERNET SAUVIGNON). FOCUS ON ACIDITY AND SENSORY IMPACT AFTER FIVE YEARS OF AGING

Climate change has brought several impacts that are becoming increasingly intense during the last few years and put at risk the quality of the berries or even the plant’s sustainability. Such extreme climatic events impact the composition of the wine while modulating its quality and the consumer preferences (Tempère et al., 2019). The three most important changes that take place in the must are: 1) decrease acidity, 2) increase of the concentration of sugar, hence increase of alcohol in the wine, and 3) modification
of the sensory balance and the development for example of cooked fruit aromas.

ACIDIC AND DEMALIC SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS FOR MANAGING PROBLEMS OF ACIDITY DURING THE ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION

In a recent study several genes controlling the acidification properties of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified by a QTL approach [1]. Many of these genes showed allelic variations that affect the metabolism of malic acid and the pH homeostasis during the alcoholic fermentation. Such alleles have been used for driving genetic selection of new S. cerevisiae starters that may conversely acidify or deacidify the wine by producing or consuming large amount of malic acid [2]. This particular feature drastically modulates the final pH of wine with difference of 0.5 units between the two groups.

CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF A POLYPHENOLIC EXTRACT OBTAINED BY GREEN SUPERCRITICAL CO₂ EXTRACTION FROM RED GRAPE POMACE

Upgrading wine industry solid wastes is considered as one of the main strategies to support the circular economy. Red grape pomaces constitute a rich source of polyphenols, which have been shown to possess antioxidant properties and to provide benefits for human and animal health. The objective of this work was to obtain and characterise polyphenolic extracts from red grape pomaces via green supercritical CO₂ extraction using ethanol as a co-solvent, and to evaluate their antibacterial activity against susceptible and multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains of animal intestinal origin.