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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 FERMENTATION POTENTIAL OF INDIGENOUS NON-SACCHAROMYCES YEASTS ISOLATED FROM MARAŠTINA GRAPES OF CROATIAN VINEYARDS

FERMENTATION POTENTIAL OF INDIGENOUS NON-SACCHAROMYCES YEASTS ISOLATED FROM MARAŠTINA GRAPES OF CROATIAN VINEYARDS

Abstract

The interest in indigenous non-Saccharomyces yeast for use in wine production has increased in recent years because they contribute to the complex character of the wine. The aim of this work was to investigate the fermentation products of ten indigenous strains selected from a collection of native yeasts established at the Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation in 2021, previously isolated from Croatian Maraština grapes, belonging to Hypopichia pseudoburtonii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Metschnikowia sinensis, Metschnikowia chrysoperlae, Lachancea thermotolerans, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora guillermondii, Hanseniaspora pseudoguillermondii, and Starmerella apicola species, and compare it with commercial non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains. The Maraština sterile grape juice was inoculated with yeast isolates at a concentration of 10⁶ cells/mL in a laboratory flask. The fermentation process was monitored by psycho-chemical parameters and yeast cell counting on WL agar plates. Samples were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transformation (FTIR). Residual sugar after alcoholic fermentation was between 2.3 and 6.8 g/L for all species.

M. chrysoperlae was yeast first finished fermentation after 20 days. Production of volatile acidity was similar for all indigenous yeasts (0.55-0.68 g/L) except H. pseudoguillermonondii which produced 0.87 g/L of volatile acidity and the lowest level of ethanol (11.5 % vol). On the other side, M. sinensis produced wines with the highest level of ethanol (12.7 % vol) and with low concentrations of malic acid. Fermentation with H. pseudoburtonii showed the highest level of lactic acid, 0.67 g/L. The obtained results allow the selection of yeasts for further research in the selection of potential starter cultures for creating a wine with regional character.
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DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Ana BOBAN¹, Vesna MILANOVIĆ², Zvonimir JURUN¹, Ana MUCALO¹, Irena BUDIĆ-LETO¹

1. Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, 21 000 Split, Croatia
2. Polytechnic University of Marche, Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Ancona, Italy, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona, Italy

Contact the author*

Keywords

non-Saccharomyces, monoculture fermentation, FTIR, yeast cell counting

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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