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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 IMPACT OF MINERAL AND ORGANIC NITROGEN ADDITION ON ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION WITH S. CEREVISIAE

IMPACT OF MINERAL AND ORGANIC NITROGEN ADDITION ON ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION WITH S. CEREVISIAE

Abstract

During alcoholic fermentation, nitrogen is one of essential nutrient for yeast as it plays a key role in sugar transport and biosynthesis of and wine aromatic compounds (thiols, esters, higher alcohols). The main issue of a lack in yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) in winemaking is sluggish or stuck fermentations promoting the growth of alteration species and leads to economic losses. Currently, grape musts are often characterized by low YAN concentration and an increase of sugars concentration due to global warming, making alcoholic fermentations even more difficult. YAN depletion can be corrected by addition of inorganic (ammonia) or organic (yeast derivatives products) nitrogen during alcoholic fermentation.

The aim of this work was to study the impact of the timing and the nature of nitrogen addition (mineral, organic or mixed) on alcoholic fermentation. First, 16 commercial strains were inoculated in Sauvignon blanc grape must deficient in YAN (110 mgN/L) and with reducing sugars concentration adjusted to 240 g/L (potential alcohol content of 14.3 %vol.). Fermentation kinetics of strains were then classified in 3 groups: stuck, sluggish or complete alcoholic fermentations. New experiments were carried on in the same grape must supplemented in YAN with ammonium (mineral) or yeast derivatives products (100% organic or mixed 30% organic- 70% mineral) to get 200 mgN/L. YAN additions were made at the beginning of alcoholic fermentation (single addition) or in two additions (50% at the beginning + 50% at the middle of alcoholic fermentation).

Our results showed that supplementing YAN twice with the mixed yeast derivative allowed complete alcoholic fermentations with reduced durations for all strains that initially showed stuck and sluggish fermentations.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Laura Chasseriaud1, Arnaud Delaherche2, Yves Gosselin2, Etienne Dorignac2, Marina Bely1

1UMR 1366 Œnologie, Université de Bordeaux, INRAE, Bordeaux INP, BSA, ISVV
2Société Industrielle Lesaffre, division Fermentis, 137 rue Gabriel Péri, 59700 Marcq en Baroeul, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

alcoholic fermentation, nitrogen addition, organic/mineral nitrogen, S. cerevisiae

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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