Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Trans-resveratrol concentrations in wines Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile

Trans-resveratrol concentrations in wines Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile

Abstract

This study evaluated the levels of trans-resveratrol in commercial wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon grapes from different valleys of Chile stilbenes. The Cabernet Sauvignon is the most planted variety in Chile, being 38% of the total vineyard country. Chile is the fourth largest wine exporter in the world, so it is important to evaluate the Cabernet-Sauvignon wines in their concentration levels of trans-resveratrol and its relation to the benefits provided to human health in moderate consumption. Evaluation comprises commercial wines from different valleys of Chile and its relationship with climatic characteristics, soil and vineyard handling. Wines were evaluated chemically and enological, levels of trans-resveratrol were measured with an analytical HPLC method, which was already validated in our laboratory, with reverse phase column and UV detector. The results obtained by this method ranged in values between 1.61 and 5.31 (mg / L) of trans-resveratrol, depending on the geographic origin and vineyard handling.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Consuelo Ceppi de Lecco*, Consuelo Tastets, Lorena Villalobos

*Universidad Catolica

Contact the author

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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