Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Screening sensory-directed methodology for the selection of non-saccharomyces wine yeasts based on perceived aroma quality

Screening sensory-directed methodology for the selection of non-saccharomyces wine yeasts based on perceived aroma quality

Abstract

The present work contributes by developing a rapid sensory-directed methodology for the screening and selection of high quality wines with different sensory profiles Therefore, Verdejo and Tempranillo musts were fermented with 50 different yeasts each under controlled laboratory conditions. Resulting samples were firstly categorized according to five levels of quality by a panel of wine professionals (Sáenz-Navajas, Ballester et al. 2013). Higher quality samples were described by flash profiling by a semi-trained panel (Valentin, Chollet et al. 2012) and most distinctive samples were screened by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) (López, Aznar et al. 2002). Seven Verdejo and five Tempranillo samples were classified in the highest quality category, presenting different aroma profiles such as citrus, fruit in syrup, boxtree/vegetal, tropical or wet grain aromas for Verdejo and red fruit or fruit in syrup for Tempranillo. β-damascenone, 3-mercaptohexyl acetate and ethyl butyrate appeared as distinctive quality compounds linked to dried, tropical and red fruit aromas, respectively. Categorization task followed by flash profiling and GC-O analysis has revealed to be a rapid and effective sensory-directed methodology for the screening of distinctive and quality wine aroma profiles in a case study of yeast selection. Wine industry could benefit from the use of this methodology as a complementary tool for optimizing technical processes along elaboration.

López, R., M. Aznar, et al. (2002). “Determination of minor and trace volatile compounds in wine by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.” Journal of Chromatography A 966(1–2): 167-177. Sáenz-Navajas, M.-P., J. Ballester, et al. (2013). “Sensory drivers of intrinsic quality of red wines: Effect of culture and level of expertise.” Food Research International 54(2): 1506-1518. Valentin, D., S. Chollet, et al. (2012). “Quick and dirty but still pretty good: a review of new descriptive methods in food science.” International Journal of Food Science & Technology 47(8): 1563-1578.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Yohanna Alegre Martine*, Arancha De-La-Fuente, Maria Pilar Saenz-Navaja, Purificación Hernández-Orte, Vicente Ferreira

*University of Zaragoza

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Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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