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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Vine response to compost addition on a sandy-loam soil in the north-east of italy. Effects on root system, vegetative growth, yield and grape quality of Cabernet-Sauvignon cv

Vine response to compost addition on a sandy-loam soil in the north-east of italy. Effects on root system, vegetative growth, yield and grape quality of Cabernet-Sauvignon cv

Abstract

In this study two different compost types and two application methods were studied over 5 years (2009-2013) on mature Cabernet Sauvignon vines grown in a commercial vineyard in the AOC Piave area, northeastern Italy. The treatments compared were: IM: inter-row application of compost from cattle manure, at a rate of 4 t/ha/y fresh weight (fw); IW: inter-row application of compost from vineyard pruning waste, at 4 t/ha/y (fw); UW: under-row application of compost from vineyard pruning waste, at 4 t/ha/y (fw); C: control with no amendment/fertilization. Effects on soil characteristics and on vine performances, including root density and distribution, were assessed. IW treatment showed the best overall performance, displaying well-balanced root/shoot growth, increased yield, and satisfactory grape quality. Inter-row addition of compost from cattle manure (IM) and localized addition of compost from pruning wastes (UW) stimulated ether high vegetative growth or high root development and in both cases, a reduction in fruit quality was observed, likely due to competition between vegetative organs (shoots or roots) and the fruit.

DOI:

Publication date: June 23, 2020

Issue: Terroir 2016

Type: Article

Authors

Federica Gaiotti (1), Patrick Marcuzzo (1), Nicola Belfiore (1), Lorenzo Lovat (1), Diego Tomasi (1)

(1) CREA – Centro di ricerca per la viticoltura, Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia agraria, 31015 Conegliano, Italy

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Keywords

compost, organic amendments, root system, grapevine, soil management practices

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Terroir 2016

Citation

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