Water is the most abundant active compound in wine!

Proton relaxation in model and real wines was investigated by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry. Albeit protons of wine are largely belonging to water molecules, their magnetic relaxation rates actually depend on various physico-chemical parameters related to the state of the wine and to its composition. The dominant relaxation mechanism unambiguously originates from proton interaction with paramagnetic ions naturally present in wines. This allows for gathering information on these paramagnetic ions, and in particular, manganese ion concentration, down to few tens of µg/L can be easily measured in situ. In this communication, we will further show how chemical and physical characteristics of the wine, including the oxidation level, the concentration in dissolved gas, or the viscosity can affect the proton relaxation rates, thus making water an active chemical probe of a wine properties.

Presenting author: Philippe Bodart – UMR A 02.102 PAM Université de Bourgogne/Agrosup Dijon – Equipe Physico-Chimie de l’Aliment et du Vin (PCAV)

Additionnal authors: Syuzanna, Esoyan | Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Institut Agro, UMR PAM A02.102, 1 Esplanade Erasme, 21000 Dijon, France., Adam Rachocki | Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan, Poland., Jadwiga Tritt-Goc | Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan, Poland., Bernhard Michalke | Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry, Department of Environmental Sciences, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany., Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin | Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry, Department of Environmental Sciences, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. – Chair of Analytical Food Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Alte Akademie 10, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany., Thomas Karbowiak | Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Institut Agro, UMR PAM A02.102, 1 Esplanade Erasme, 21000 Dijon, France., Regis D. Gougeon | Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Institut Agro, UMR PAM A02.102, 1 Esplanade Erasme, 21000 Dijon, France.

Email: philippe.bodart@u-bourgogne.fr

Keywords: proton NMR relaxometry – manganese

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