Metabolomic study of mixed Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast during fermentation

Alcoholic fermentation conducted by microorganism is a key step in the production of wine. In this process, interactions between different species of yeast are widely described but their mechanisms are still poorly understood. The interactions studied in wine are mainly between Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species. Therefore, little is known about the mechanisms of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in mixed culture, yet they are major actors that are in part responsible for the metabolic modifications within each strain and therefore for the quality of the final product. In order to better understand interactions occurring between two strains of S. cerevisiae, pure cultures were compared with mixed co-cultures and blend of wines using ultra high-resolution mass spectrometry, LC-MS, GC-MS and sensory analysis. Three mixed were studied, on the same Chardonnay must, each involving a common strain. Ultrahigh -resolution mass spectrometry (uHRMS) revealed important differences between pure cultures and mixed cultures. This work reports that mixed fermentation led to changes in chemical wine composition. Besides, we found that the blends showed a different chemical composition than mixed cultures. This indicates that the co-culture did not consist of the addition of two independent yeast metabolisms but of interaction events.  We also observed that depending on the strain associated to the common strain, there were interaction phenomena of different natures. These findings were further demonstrated by the volatilome study of 65 volatile compounds and sensory analysis. Indeed, a modulation of the volatile composition and sensory profile were noted when both strains were combined but also according to the strains involved in the fermentation.

Presenting author: FANNY BORDET – Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR A 02.102, F-21000 Dijon,France-IUVV, rue Claude Ladrey, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon CEDEX, France ; Lallemand SAS, 19 rue des Briquetiers, Blagnac CEDEX, France

Additionnal authors: Rémy Romanet | Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR A 02.102, F-21000 Dijon,France-IUVV, rue Claude Ladrey, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon CEDEX, France, Florian Bahut | Lallemand SAS, 19 rue des Briquetiers, Blagnac CEDEX, France, Jordi Ballester | Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l’Alimentation, AgroSup Dijon, CNRS, INRA, Université Bourgogne – Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France, Cristina Peña | University of Zaragoza, Nutrition, Laboratorio de Análisis del Aroma y Enología (LAAE) Dpt. Química Analítica. Facultad de Ciencias, . 50009 Zaragoza. Spain, Régis Gougeon | Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR A 02.102, F-21000 Dijon,France-IUVV, rue Claude Ladrey, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon CEDEX, France, Anne Julien-Ortiz | Lallemand SAS, 19 rue des Briquetiers, Blagnac CEDEX, France, Philippe Schmitt Kopplin | German Research Center for Environmental Health, Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany, Chloé Roullier-Gall | Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR A 02.102, F-21000 Dijon,France-IUVV, rue Claude Ladrey, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon CEDEX, France, Hervé Alexandre | Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR A 02.102, F-21000 Dijon,France-IUVV, rue Claude Ladrey, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon CEDEX, France,

Email: bordet.fanny@gmail.com

Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae – interactions – metabolomic – sensory analysis – volatiles compounds

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