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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 IMPACT OF HARVEST DATE ON THE FINE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION OF MUST AND BORDEAUX RED WINE (VAR. MERLOT, CABERNET SAUVIGNON). FOCUS ON ACIDITY AND SENSORY IMPACT AFTER FIVE YEARS OF AGING

IMPACT OF HARVEST DATE ON THE FINE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION OF MUST AND BORDEAUX RED WINE (VAR. MERLOT, CABERNET SAUVIGNON). FOCUS ON ACIDITY AND SENSORY IMPACT AFTER FIVE YEARS OF AGING

Abstract

Climate change has brought several impacts that are becoming increasingly intense during the last few years and put at risk the quality of the berries or even the plant’s sustainability. Such extreme climatic events impact the composition of the wine while modulating its quality and the consumer preferences (Tempère et al., 2019). The three most important changes that take place in the must are: 1) decrease acidity, 2) increase of the concentration of sugar, hence increase of alcohol in the wine, and 3) modification of the sensory balance and the development for example of cooked fruit aromas. These nuances are also associated with the “premature aging” phenomenon, mostly during bottle aging. In the context of this work, impact molecular markers [] were evaluated in Bordeaux red wines after 5 years of aging under controlled conditions. The main goal of this study was to examine the importance of the link between the must acidity at Numerous results shed light on the significant impact of the maturity level as well as the variety on the molecular markers after 5 years of aging. This gives us some valuable information in order to better understand the role of harvest date and the acidity level in the must on wine evolution during aging but also to better adapt Bordeaux terroirs and grape varieties to future changes.

1. Sophie Tempère, Stéphanie Pérès, Alejandro Fuentes Espinoza, Philippe Darriet, Eric Giraud-Heraud, et al.. Consumer preferences for different red wine styles and repeated exposure effects. Food Quality and Preference, 2019, 73, pp.110-116.⟨10.1016/j.foodqual.2018.12.009).

DOI:

Publication date: February 12, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Zoi Avramidou1,2, Margaux Cameleyre1,2, Alexandre Pons1,2,3, Axel Marchal1,2, Michael Jourdes1,2, Taku Saito1,4, Soizic Lacampagne1,2, Pascaline Redon1,2, Laurence Geny1,2, Pierre-Louis Tesseidre1,2, Philippe Darriet1,2, C.line Cholet1,2

1. Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux INP, INRAE, OENO, UMR 1366, ISVV, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2. Bordeaux Sciences Agro, F-33170 Gradignan, France
3. Seguin Moreau Cooperage, ZI Merpins, F-16103 Cognac, France
4. Suntory

Contact the author*

Keywords

Climate Change, Premature aging, acidity, taste

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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