Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 Influence of preflowering basal leaf removal on aromatic composition of cv. Tempranillo wine from semiarid climate (Extremadura Western Spain)

Influence of preflowering basal leaf removal on aromatic composition of cv. Tempranillo wine from semiarid climate (Extremadura Western Spain)

Abstract

Abstract In this work the effects of early leaf removal performed manually at preflowering phenological stage, on the volatile composition of Tempranillo (Vitis vinifera L.) wines were studied. From 2009-2011 vintages 34 wine volatile compounds were identified and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) where early leaf removal only modified 25 of them. The total C6 compounds, acetates and volatiles acids (with exception of isobutyric acid) were affected by defoliation, whereas alcohols and esters showed a minor effect. Furthermore the vintage effect also was shown. On the 2009 a highest influence of defoliation was shown than the other vintages, where early defoliation induces an increased of all volatile compound families. Principal component analysis (PCA) illustrated the difference in wines from defoliated and non-defoliated treatments based on the wines volatile composition. Finally, the analysis of the odour activity value (OAV) showed an increase of fruity and floral odour when defoliation was applied.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Mar Vilanova*, Daniel Moreno, David Uriarte, Esperanza Valdes, Esther Gamero, Inmaculada Talaverano

*CSIC

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Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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