Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 South Africa’s top 10 Sauvignon blanc wines. How do the chemical and sensory profiles compare?

South Africa’s top 10 Sauvignon blanc wines. How do the chemical and sensory profiles compare?

Abstract

FNB Top 10 Sauvignon Blanc competition, presented by the Sauvignon Blanc Interest Group of South Africa and sponsored by First National Bank, is the country’s foremost platform for producers of this cultivar to showcase and benchmark their wines. Wines entered in the competition originated from all over the winegrowing regions of the country and the winning wines showed good representation of quality South African Sauvignon blanc wines. The ten selected wines were subjected to various chemical analyses including volatile thiol and methoxypyrazine determination, while the sensory profile of each wine was determined using projective mapping. Results showed great diversity in Sauvignon blanc wine styles: from fresh and fruity to green to wooded wines. The sensory results of the selected wines did not always correspond to the chemical profile highlighting the importance of other aroma compounds impacting the wines as well as interactions occurring between volatile compounds. This evaluation supplies the local and international market with information on South African Sauvignon blanc production and quality wine selection.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Carien Coetzee*, Wessel du Toit

*University of Stellenbosch

Contact the author

Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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