Macrowine 2021
IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 The challenge of quality in sulphur dioxide free wines: natural polyphenol alternatives

The challenge of quality in sulphur dioxide free wines: natural polyphenol alternatives

Abstract

Sulphur dioxide (SO2) seems indispensable in winemaking because of its properties. However, a current increasing concern about its allergies effects in food product has addressed the international research efforts on its replacement. This supposes a sufficient knowledge of its properties and conditions of use. Several studies compared SO2 properties against new alternatives that are supposed to overcome SO2 disadvantages. Firstly, the state of art on SO2 wine replacements is revised, and secondly, the last promising results using natural enriched polyphenol extracts are shown. Extracts enriched in hydroxytyrosol and stilbenes were tested in white and red wines. Wine evolution was monitored during winemaking and ageing in bottled. Moreover, different winemaking technologies were applied to achieve a quality free SO2 wines. Oenological parameters, color related parameters, sensory analysis, and GC-olfactometry were performed on wines elaborated with polyphenols-enriched extracts and compared with these elaborated with SO2. Wines elaborated with stilbene-enriched extract showed the most promising results, especially red wines. The storage in bottle seems to be the most challenging point of the process since wines without SO2 evolved quicker. Further experiments must be developed to overcome this challenge.

Publication date: May 17, 2024

Issue: Macrowine 2016

Type: Poster

Authors

Emma Cantos*, Belen Puertas, Jose Moreno-Rojas, María Ruiz-Moreno, Rafaela Raposo, Raul Guerrero, Victor Ortiz

*IFAPA

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Tags

IVES Conference Series | Macrowine | Macrowine 2016

Citation

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