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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Terroir Conferences 9 Terroir 2016 9 Climates of Wine Regions Worldwide 9 Changing New Zealand climate equals a changing New Zealand terroir?

Changing New Zealand climate equals a changing New Zealand terroir?

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Publication date: June 23, 2020

Issue: Terroir 2016

Type: Article

Authors

Mike Trought (1), Amber Parker (2), Andrew Sturman (3), Rob Agnew (1)

(1) The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, Marlborough Wine Research Centre, Blenheim, New Zealand
(2) Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand
(3) Centre for Atmospheric Research, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

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IVES Conference Series | Terroir 2016

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