Evaluating alternatives to cold stabilization in wineries: the use of carboximethyl cellulose, potassium polyaspartate, electrodialysis and ion exchange resins – the results after one year in the bottle

The tartaric stabilization of wines before bottling to avoid the precipitation of tartaric acid salts is an important and common step during wine production. The presence of precipitated salt crystals in bottle wines is detrimental for their quality and even a legal issue in some countries. Cold stabilization is the most common stabilization treatment. Although it has been shown to be effective, it has some significant disadvantages, mainly regarding losses of color and aromas and its high cost. Therefore, other products and methodologies are being introduced in the wineries for the replacement of this process. Some of these new techniques involve the reduction of the ions causing the insolubilization of tartaric acid while other are based in the formation of protective colloids or the inhibition of the crystallization of salts. In this study, white, rosé and red wines have been treated with carboxymethylcellulose, potassium polyaspartate and an ion exchange resin. The tartaric stability of the wines, together with the oenological, chromatic and sensory characteristics were studied after the wines had been stored during one year in the bottle. The results indicate that the use of carboxymethyl cellulose and potassium polyaspartate maintained the best the sensory and chromatic characteristics and the wine stability of the wines in comparison with an untreated control wine. 

The potassium polyaspartate treated wine being, in general, the wines preferred in a sensory analysis test.

Authors: Encarna Gómez Plaza, Pilar Martínez-Pérez 

Facultad de Veterinaria, Campus Espinardo 30100 Murcia, SPAIN 

Email: encarna.gomez@um.es 

Keywords: WINE, STABILIZATION, TARTARIC ACID, ADDITIVES 

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