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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Congress on Grapevine and Wine Sciences 9 2ICGWS-2023 9 The generation of suspended cell wall material may limit the effect of ultrasound in some varieties

The generation of suspended cell wall material may limit the effect of ultrasound in some varieties

Abstract

The disruptive effect exerted by high-power ultrasound (US) on plant cell walls, natural barriers to the diffusion of compounds of interest during the maceration of red wines, is established as the reason behind the chromatic improvement that its treatment causes.  However, sometimes this improvement is not observed, especially with short maceration times. The presence of a high quantity of suspended cell wall material, which formation is favored by the sonication, could be the cause of this lack of positive results since this cell wall material has a high affinity for phenolic compounds. These phenolic compounds bound to the cell walls precipitate with them during the following stages of vinification and due to that, a large part of the extracted phenolic compounds will not become part of the final wine’s phenolic composition, affecting its chromatic characteristics. To prove this, wine made from sonicated grapes from two different varieties has been submitted to a modification in the vinification process where the suspended material has been eliminated.  The results have confirmed that that the lack of positive results found in some cases when grapes were sonicated are due to the adsorption of phenolic compounds on the suspended material and that differences in the grape skin cell wall composition also had a large influence.

References:

  1. Jiménez-Martínez M.D. et al. (2018). Performance of purified grape pomace as a fining agent to reduce the levels of some contaminants from wine. Food Addit. Contam. Part A, 35 (6): 1061–1070, DOI.org/10.1080/19440049.2018.1459050
  2. Moller, I. et al. (2008). High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles. Glycoconj. J., 25(1): 37–48, DOI: 10.1007/s10719-007-9059-7

DOI:

Publication date: October 4, 2023

Issue: ICGWS 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Paula Pérez-Porras1, Ana B. Bautista-Ortín1, Ricardo Jurado2, Encarna Gómez Plaza1

1 Departamento de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia, 30071, Murcia, España
2 Agrovin S.A., Avenida de los Vinos s/n, 13600 Alcázar de San Juan, Ciudad Real, España

Contact the author*

Keywords

wine, fining, vegetal fiber, polysaccharides, CoMPP

Tags

2ICGWS | ICGWS | ICGWS 2023 | IVES Conference Series

Citation

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