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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 International Congress on Grapevine and Wine Sciences 9 2ICGWS-2023 9 Impact of climate on berry weight dynamics of a wide range of Vitis vinifera cultivars 

Impact of climate on berry weight dynamics of a wide range of Vitis vinifera cultivars 

Abstract

In order to study the impact of climate change on Bordeaux grape varieties and to assess the behavior of candidate grape varieties potentially better adapted to the new climatic conditions, an experimental vineyard composed of 52 grape varieties was planted in 2009 at the INRAE Bordeaux Aquitaine center[1]. Among the many parameters studied since 2012, berry weight for each variety was measured weekly from mid-veraison to maturity, with four independent replicates. The kinetics obtained allowed to study berry growth, a key parameter in grape composition and yield.
Ten years of data enabled the classification of varieties according to their berry weight, which ranged from 1 to 3 grams per berry on average. The year effect was also evaluated, in particular in relation to vine water status, which was assessed by examinating rainfall patterns and measuring carbon isotope discrimination (
δ13C) on grape berry juice. Finally, the link between berry weight and seed number was studied for each variety in order to evaluate both the year and genetic effects.
This study provides a better understanding and characterisation of the environmental and genetic factors that govern berry weight across a wide range of grape varieties.

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank the UE Vigne Bordeaux, UMR EGFV and all the students who participate over the years. This long-term monitoring was supported by Conseil Interprofessionnel du Vin de Bordeaux, Région Aquitaine, Univ Bordeaux through LabEx and Jas. Hennessy & Co.

 

References:

1)  Destrac Irvine A. and van Leeuwen C. (2016) The VitAdapt project: extensive phenotyping of a wide range of varieties in order to optimize the use of genetic diversity within the Vitis vinifera species as a tool for adaptation to a changing environment. Climwine, sustainable grape and wine production in the context of climate change, 11-13 April 2016, Bordeaux. Full text proceedings paper, 165-171.    

DOI:

Publication date: October 11, 2023

Issue: ICGWS 2023

Type: Poster

Authors

Agnès DESTRAC IRVINE1*, Mauricio GONZALEZ BATULE1, Mark GOWDY1 and Cornelis VAN LEEUWEN1

1EGFV, Univ. Bordeaux, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, INRAE, ISVV, F-33882 Villenave d’Ornon, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

vine, berry weight, classification, climate change, yield

Tags

2ICGWS | ICGWS | ICGWS 2023 | IVES Conference Series

Citation

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