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IVES 9 IVES Conference Series 9 WINE CONSUMER TRADE-OFF BETWEEN ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS AND SUSTAINABLE CLAIMS. AN EXPERIMENT ON RED WINES FROM BORDEAUX REGION

WINE CONSUMER TRADE-OFF BETWEEN ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS AND SUSTAINABLE CLAIMS. AN EXPERIMENT ON RED WINES FROM BORDEAUX REGION

Abstract

In economics, the perception of wine quality is not limited to sensorial characteristics: an indication of the region of production significantly affects the perception of quality and consumers’ WTP ([1]; [2]). However, [3] or more recently [4] show that even if a wine has an organic label, the taste of wine remains the predominant criterion in consumer preferences. The contribution of our experiment is to evaluate the impact of responsible attributes (organic label, Non Added Sulfites, HVE certification) on the appreciation of several red wines on the market. More than 280 consumers participated to the present study and they perform 25 tastings divided into 5 different sessions. 20 different red wines from Bordeaux Area are tasted.

We used sensory analysis and experimental economics techniques in order to evaluate the liking and willingness to pay of consumers, according to previous works describing this technique for wine market [5].

The main interest of this paper remains the evaluation of wine by sensorial analysis and experimental auctions. In a context of increasing responsible initiatives in the wine sector, the design and results of this study bring some insights on the important issue of consumer preferences for red wines and their trade-offs between the different wine attributes. Results show that consumer expectations for corporate responsibility labeling are growing. However, the share of consumers who actually value it is small. In addition, the sensory quality of the wine remains a primary expectation.

 

1. Bazoche, P., Combris, P., Giraud-Héraud, E., Traversac, J.-B., 2013. Willingness to Pay for Appellation of Origin: Results of an Experiment with Pinot Noir Wines in France and Germany, in: Giraud-Héraud, E., Pichery, M.-C. (Eds.), Wine Economics: Quantitative Studies and Empirical Applications, Applied Econometrics Association Series. Palgrave Macmillan UK, London, pp. 129–145. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137289520_8
2. Combris, P., Lange, C., Issanchou, S., 2006. Assessing the Effect of Information on the Reservation Price for Champagne: What are Consumers Actually Paying for? Journal of Wine Economics 1, 75–88. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1931436100000109
3. Rahman, I., Stumpf, T., Reynolds, D., 2014. A Comparison of the Influence of Purchaser Attitudes and Product Attributes on Organic Wine Preferences. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly 55, 127–134. https://doi.org/10.1177/1938965513496314
4. Pérès, S., Giraud-Heraud, E., Masure, A.-S., Tempere, S., 2020. Rosé Wine Market: Anything but Colour? Foods 9, 1850. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121850
5. Becker, G., De Groot M., Marschak, J. 1964. Measuring utility by a single response sequential method. Behavioural Science, 9, 226–232.

DOI:

Publication date: February 9, 2024

Issue: OENO Macrowine 2023

Type: Article

Authors

Léa Lecomte¹, Eric Giraud-Heraud², Marine Gammacurta³, Philippe Darriet³, Sophie Tempere³, Stéphanie Peres¹

1. Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, BSE, UMR 6060, INRAE, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, F-33600 Pessac, France
2. Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, BSE, UMR 6060, INRAE, F-33600 Pessac, France
3. UMR Œnologie, Institut des Sciences de la Vigne et du Vin, Univ. Bordeaux, INRAE, IPB, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon, France

Contact the author*

Keywords

Experimental Economics, Consumer preferences, Willingness to pay, Sustainability

Tags

IVES Conference Series | oeno macrowine 2023 | oeno-macrowine

Citation

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